Chapter 3
Analysis of Financial Statements
ANSWERS TO END-OF-CHAPTER QUESTIONS




3-1 a. A liquidity ratio is a ratio that shows the relationship of a firm’s cash and other current assets to its current liabilities. The current ratio is found by dividing current assets by current liabilities. It indicates the extent to which current liabilities are covered by those assets expected to be converted to cash in the near future. The quick, or acid test, ratio is found by taking current assets less inventories and then dividing by current liabilities.

b. Asset management ratios are a set of ratios which measure how effectively a firm is managing its assets. The inventory turnover ratio is sales divided by inventories. Days sales outstanding is used to appraise accounts receivable and indicates the length of time the firm must wait after making a sale before receiving cash. It is found by dividing receivables by average sales per day. The fixed assets turnover ratio measures how effectively the firm uses its plant and equipment. It is the ratio of sales to net fixed assets. Total assets turnover ratio measures the turnover of all the firm’s assets; it is calculated by dividing sales by total assets.

c. Financial leverage ratios measure the use of debt financing. The debt ratio is the ratio of total debt to total assets, it measures the percentage of funds provided by creditors. The times-interest-earned ratio is determined by dividing earnings before interest and taxes by the interest charges. This ratio measures the extent to which operating income can decline before the firm is unable to meet its annual interest costs. The EBITDA coverage ratio is similar to the times-interest-earned ratio, but it recognizes that many firms lease assets and also must make sinking fund payments. It is found by adding EBITDA and lease payments then dividing this total by interest charges, lease payments, and sinking fund payments over one minus the tax rate.

d. Profitability ratios are a group of ratios which show the combined effects of liquidity, asset management, and debt on operations. The profit margin on sales, calculated by dividing net income by sales, gives the profit per dollar of sales. Basic earning power is calculated by dividing EBIT by total assets. This ratio shows the raw earning power of the firm’s assets, before the influence of taxes and leverage. Return on total assets is the ratio of net income to total assets. Return on common equity is found by dividing net income into common equity.

e. Market value ratios relate the firm’s stock price to its earnings and book value per share. The price/earnings ratio is calculated by dividing price per share by earnings per share--this shows how much investors are willing to pay per dollar of reported profits. The price/cash flow is calculated by dividing price per share by cash flow per share. This shows how much investors are willing to pay per dollar of cash flow. Market-to-book ratio is simply the market price per share divided by the book value per share. Book value per share is common equity divided by the number of shares outstanding.

f. Trend analysis is an analysis of a firm’s financial ratios over time. It is used to estimate the likelihood of improvement or deterioration in its financial situation. Comparative ratio analysis is when a firm compares its ratios to other leading companies in the same industry. This technique is also known as benchmarking.

g. The Du Pont chart is a chart designed to show the relationships among return on investment, asset turnover, the profit margin, and leverage. The Du Pont equation is a formula which shows that the rate of return on assets can be found as the product of the profit margin times the total assets turnover.

h. Window dressing is a technique employed by firms to make their financial statements look better than they really are. Seasonal factors can distort ratio analysis. At certain times of the year a firm may have excessive inventories in preparation of a “season” of high demand. Therefore an inventory turnover ratio taken at this time as opposed to after the season will be radically distorted.

3-2 The emphasis of the various types of analysts is by no means uniform nor should it be. Management is interested in all types of ratios for two reasons. First, the ratios point out weaknesses that should be strengthened; second, management recognizes that the other parties are interested in all the ratios and that financial appearances must be kept up if the firm is to be regarded highly by creditors and equity investors. Equity investors are interested primarily in profitability, but they examine the other ratios to get information on the riskiness of equity commitments. Long-term creditors are more interested in the debt ratio, TIE, and fixed-charge coverage ratios, as well as the profitability ratios. Short-term creditors emphasize liquidity and look most carefully at the liquidity ratios.

3-3 The inventory turnover ratio is important to a grocery store because of the much larger inventory required and because some of that inventory is perishable. An insurance company would have no inventory to speak of since its line of business is selling insurance policies or other similar financial products--contracts written on paper and entered into between the company and the insured. This question demonstrates the fact that the student should not take a routine approach to financial analysis but rather should examine the particular business he or she is dealing with.

3-4 Given that sales have not changed, a decrease in the total assets turnover means that the company’s assets have increased. Also, the fact that the fixed assets turnover ratio remained constant implies that the company increased its current assets. Since the company’s current ratio increased, and yet, its quick ratio is unchanged means that the company has increased its inventories.

3-5 Differences in the amounts of assets necessary to generate a dollar of sales cause asset turnover ratios to vary among industries. For example, a steel company needs a greater number of dollars in assets to produce a dollar in sales than does a grocery store chain. Also, profit margins and turnover ratios may vary due to differences in the amount of expenses incurred to produce sales. For example, one would expect a grocery store chain to spend more per dollar of sales than does a steel company. Often, a large turnover will be associated with a low profit margin, and vice versa.

3-6 Inflation will cause earnings to increase, even if there is no increase in sales volume. Yet, the book value of the assets that produced the sales and the annual depreciation expense remain at historic values and do not reflect the actual cost of replacing those assets. Thus, ratios that compare current flows with historic values become distorted over time.
For example, ROA will increase even though those assets are generating the same sales volume.
When comparing different companies, the age of the assets will greatly affect the ratios. Companies whose assets were purchased earlier will reflect lower asset values than those that purchased the assets later at inflated prices. Two firms with similar physical assets and sales could have significantly different ROAs. Under inflation, ratios will also reflect differences in the way firms treat inventories. As can be seen, inflation affects both income statement and balance sheet items.

3-7 ROE, using the Du Pont equation, is the return on assets multiplied by the equity multiplier. The equity multiplier, defined as total assets divided by owners’ equity, is a measure of debt utilization; the more debt a firm uses, the lower its equity, and the higher the equity multiplier. Thus, using more debt will increase the equity multiplier, resulting in a higher ROE.

3-8 a. Cash, receivables, and inventories, as well as current liabilities, vary over the year for firms with seasonal sales patterns. Therefore, those ratios that examine balance sheet figures will vary unless averages (monthly ones are best) are used.

b. Common equity is determined at a point in time, say December 31, 2001. Profits are earned over time, say during 2001. If a firm is growing rapidly, year-end equity will be much larger than beginning-of-year equity, so the calculated rate of return on equity will be different depending on whether end-of-year, beginning-of-year, or average common equity is used as the denominator. Average common equity is conceptually the best figure to use. In public utility rate cases, people are reported to have deliberately used end-of-year or beginning-of-year equity to make returns on equity appear excessive or inadequate. Similar problems can arise when a firm is being evaluated.

3-9 Firms within the same industry may employ different accounting techniques which make it difficult to compare financial ratios. More fundamentally, comparisons may be misleading if firms in the same industry differ in their other investments. For example, comparing Pepsico and Coca-Cola may be misleading because apart from their soft drink business, Pepsi also owns other businesses such as Frito-Lay, Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, and KFC.

3-10 Total Effect
Current Current on Net
Assets Ratio Income

a. Cash is acquired through issuance of
additional common stock. + + 0

b. Merchandise is sold for cash. + + +

c. Federal income tax due for the previous
year is paid. - + 0

d. A fixed asset is sold for less than
book value. + + -

e. A fixed asset is sold for more than
book value. + + +

f. Merchandise is sold on credit. + + +

g. Payment is made to trade creditors for
previous purchases. - + 0

h. A cash dividend is declared and paid. - - 0

i. Cash is obtained through short-term bank
loans. + - 0

j. Short-term notes receivable are sold at
a discount. - - -

k. Marketable securities are sold below cost. - - -

l. Advances are made to employees. 0 0 0

m. Current operating expenses are paid. - - -

Total Effect
Current Current on Net
Assets Ratio Income

n. Short-term promissory notes are issued to
trade creditors in exchange for past due
accounts payable. 0 0 0

o. Ten-year notes are issued to pay off
accounts payable. 0 + 0

p. A fully depreciated asset is retired. 0 0 0

q. Accounts receivable are collected. 0 0 0

r. Equipment is purchased with short-term
notes. 0 - 0

s. Merchandise is purchased on credit. + - 0

t. The estimated taxes payable are increased. 0 - -

SOLUTIONS TO END-OF-CHAPTER PROBLEMS



3-1 CA = $3,000,000; = 1.5; = 1.0;

CL = ?; I = ?






3-2 DSO = 40 days; ADS = $20,000; AR = ?




3-3 A/E = 2.4; D/A = ?



3-4 ROA = 10%; PM = 2%; ROE = 15%; S/TA = ?; A/E = ?
ROA = NI/A; PM = NI/S; ROE = NI/E

ROA = PM ? S/TA
NI/A = NI/S ? S/TA
10% = 2% ? S/TA
S/TA = 5.

ROE = PM ? S/TA ? TA/E
NI/E = NI/S ? S/TA ? TA/E
15% = 2% ? 5 ? TA/E
15% = 10% ? TA/E
TA/E = 1.5.


3-5 We are given ROA = 3% and Sales/Total assets = 1.5?.

From Du Pont equation: ROA = Profit margin ? Total assets turnover
3% = Profit margin (1.5)
Profit margin = 3%/1.5 = 2%.

We can also calculate the company’s debt ratio in a similar manner, given the facts of the problem. We are given ROA(NI/A) and ROE(NI/E); if we use the reciprocal of ROE we have the following equation:



Alternatively,

ROE = ROA ? EM
5% = 3% ? EM
EM = 5%/3% = 5/3 = TA/E.

Take reciprocal:

E/TA = 3/5 = 60%;

therefore,

D/A = 1 - 0.60 = 0.40 = 40%.

Thus, the firm’s profit margin = 2% and its debt ratio = 40%.


3-6 Present current ratio = = 2.5.

Minimum current ratio = = 2.0.

$1,312,500 + DNP = $1,050,000 + 2DNP
DNP = $262,500.

Short-term debt can increase by a maximum of $262,500 without violating a 2 to 1 current ratio, assuming that the entire increase in notes payable is used to increase current assets. Since we assumed that the additional funds would be used to increase inventory, the inventory account will increase to $637,500, and current assets will total $1,575,000.

Quick ratio = ($1,575,000 - $637,500)/$787,500 = $937,500/$787,500 = 1.19?.


3-7 1. = 3.0? = 3.0?

Current liabilities = $270,000.

2. = 1.4? = 1.4?

Inventories = $432,000.

3.

$810,000 = $120,000 + Accounts receivable + $432,000
Accounts receivable = $258,000.

4. = 6.0? = 6.0?

Sales = $2,592,000.

5. DSO = = = 36 days.


3-8 TIE = EBIT/INT, so find EBIT and INT.
Interest = $500,000 ? 0.1 = $50,000.
Net income = $2,000,000 ? 0.05 = $100,000.
Pre-tax income = $100,000/(1 - T) = $100,000/0.7 = $142,857.

EBIT = $142,857 + $50,000 = $192,857.
TIE = $192,857/$50,000 = 3.86?.

3-9 ROE = Profit margin ? TA turnover ? Equity multiplier
= NI/Sales ? Sales/TA ? TA/Equity.

Now we need to determine the inputs for the equation from the data that were given. On the left we set up an income statement, and we put numbers in it on the right:

Sales (given) $10,000,000
Cost na____
EBIT (given) $ 1,000,000
INT (given) 300,000
EBT $ 700,000
Taxes (34%) 238,000
NI $ 462,000

Now we can use some ratios to get some more data:
Total assets turnover = 2 = S/TA; TA = S/2 = $10,000,000/2 = $5,000,000.

D/A = 60%; so E/A = 40%; and, therefore,
Equity multiplier = TA/E = 1/(E/A) = 1/0.4 = 2.5.

Now we can complete the Du Pont equation to determine ROE:
ROE = $462,000/$10,000,000 ? $10,000,000/$5,000,000 ? 2.5 = 0.231 = 23.1%.


3-10 Known data:

TA = $1,000,000
BEP = 0.2 = EBIT/Total assets, so EBIT = 0.2($1,000,000) = $200,000.
kd = 8%
T = 40%
D/A = 0.5 = 50%, so Equity = $500,000.

D/A = 0% D/A = 50%
EBIT $200,000 $200,000
Interest 0 40,000*
EBT $200,000 $160,000
Tax (40%) 80,000 64,000
NI $120,000 $ 96,000

ROE = = = 12%; = 19.2%.

Difference in ROE = 19.2% - 12.0% = 7.2%.

*If D/A = 50%, then half of assets are financed by debt, so Debt = $500,000. At an 8% interest rate, INT = $40,000.


3-11 Statement a is correct. Refer to the solution setup for Problem 3-10 and think about it this way: (1) Adding assets will not affect common equity if the assets are financed with debt. (2) Adding assets will cause expected EBIT to increase by the amount EBIT = BEP(added assets). (3) Interest expense will increase by the amount kd(added assets). (4) Pre-tax income will rise by the amount (added assets)(BEP - kd). Assuming BEP > kd, if pre-tax income increases so will net income. (5) If expected net income increases but common equity is held constant, then the expected ROE will also increase. Note that if kd > BEP, then adding assets financed by debt would lower net income and thus the ROE. Therefore, Statement a is true--if assets financed by debt are added, and if the expected BEP on those assets exceeds the cost of debt, then the firm’s ROE will increase.
Statements b and c are false, because the BEP ratio uses EBIT, which is calculated before the effects of taxes or interest charges are felt, and d is false unless kd > BEP. Of course, Statement e is also false.


3-12 a. Currently, ROE is ROE1 = $15,000/$200,000 = 7.5%.
The current ratio will be set such that 2.5 = CA/CL. CL is $50,000, and it will not change, so we can solve to find the new level of current assets: CA = 2.5(CL) = 2.5($50,000) = $125,000. This is the level of current assets that will produce a current ratio of 2.5?.
At present, current assets amount to $210,000, so they can be reduced by $210,000 - $125,000 = $85,000. If the $85,000 generated is used to retire common equity, then the new common equity balance will be $200,000 - $85,000 = $115,000.
Assuming that net income is unchanged, the new ROE will be ROE2 = $15,000/$115,000 = 13.04%. Therefore, ROE will increase by 13.04% - 7.50% = 5.54%.

b. 1. Doubling the dollar amounts would not affect the answer; it would still be 5.54%.

2. Common equity would increase by $25,000 from the Part a scenario, which would mean a new ROE of $15,000/$140,000 = 10.71%, which would mean a difference of 10.71% - 7.50% = 3.21%.

3. An inventory turnover of 2 would mean inventories of $100,000, down $50,000 from the current level. That would mean an ROE of $15,000/$150,000 = 10.00%, so the change in ROE would be 10.00% - 7.5% = 2.5%.

4. If the company had 10,000 shares outstanding, then its EPS would be $15,000/10,000 = $1.50. The stock has a book value of $200,000/10,000 = $20, so the shares retired would be $85,000/$20 = 4,250, leaving 10,000 - 4,250 = 5,750 shares. The new EPS would be $15,000/5,750 = $2.6087, so the increase in EPS would be $2.6087 - $1.50 = $1.1087, which is a 73.91% increase, the same as the increase in ROE.

5. If the stock was selling for twice book value, or 2 x $20 = $40, then only half as many shares could be retired ($85,000/$40 = 2,125), so the remaining shares would be 10,000 - 2,125 = 7,875, and the new EPS would be $15,000/7,875 = $1.9048, for an increase of $1.9048 - $1.5000 = $0.4048.

c. We could have started with lower inventory and higher accounts receivable, then had you calculate the DSO, then move to a lower DSO which would require a reduction in receivables, and then determine the effects on ROE and EPS under different conditions. Similarly, we could have focused on fixed assets and the FA turnover ratio. In any of these cases, we could have had you use the funds generated to retire debt, which would have lowered interest charges and consequently increased net income and EPS.
If we had to increase assets, then we would have had to finance this increase by adding either debt or equity, which would have lowered ROE and EPS, other things held constant.
Finally, note that we could have asked some conceptual questions about the problem, either as a part of the problem or without any reference to the problem. For example, “If funds are generated by reducing assets, and if those funds are used to retire common stock, will EPS and/or ROE be affected by whether or not the stock sells above, at, or below book value?”


3-13 a. (Dollar amounts in thousands.)
Industry
Firm Average

= = 1.98? 2.0?

DSO = = = 75 days 35 days

= = 6.66? 6.7?

= = 5.50? 12.1?

= = 1.70? 3.0?


= = 1.7% 1.2%


= = 2.9% 3.6%


Industry
Firm Average

= = 7.6% 9.0%

= = 61.9% 60.0%

b. For the firm,

ROE = PM ? T.A. turnover ? EM = 1.7% ? 1.7 ? = 7.6%.
For the industry, ROE = 1.2% ? 3 ? 2.5 = 9%.

Note: To find the industry ratio of assets to common equity, recognize that 1 - (total debt/total assets) = common equity/total assets. So, common equity/total assets = 40%, and 1/0.40 = 2.5 = total assets/common equity.

c. The firm’s days sales outstanding is more than twice as long as the industry average, indicating that the firm should tighten credit or enforce a more stringent collection policy. The total assets turnover ratio is well below the industry average so sales should be increased, assets decreased, or both. While the company’s profit margin is higher than the industry average, its other profitability ratios are low compared to the industry--net income should be higher given the amount of equity and assets. However, the company seems to be in an average liquidity position and financial leverage is similar to others in the industry.

d. If 2001 represents a period of supernormal growth for the firm, ratios based on this year will be distorted and a comparison between them and industry averages will have little meaning. Potential investors who look only at 2001 ratios will be misled, and a return to normal conditions in 2002 could hurt the firm’s stock price.


3-14 1. Debt = (0.50)(Total assets) = (0.50)($300,000) = $150,000.

2. Accounts payable = Debt – Long-term debt = $150,000 - $60,000
= $90,000

3. Common stock = - Debt - Retained earnings
= $300,000 - $150,000 - $97,500 = $52,500.

4. Sales = (1.5)(Total assets) = (1.5)($300,000) = $450,000.

5. Inventory = Sales/5 = $450,000/5 = $90,000.

6. Accounts receivable = (Sales/360)(DSO) = ($450,000/360)(36)
= $45,000.

7. Cash + Accounts receivable = (0.80)(Accounts payable)
Cash + $45,000 = (0.80)($90,000)
Cash = $72,000 - $45,000 = $27,000.

8. Fixed assets = Total assets - (Cash + Accts rec. + Inventories)
= $300,000 - ($27,000 + $45,000 + $90,000) = $138,000.

9. Cost of goods sold = (Sales)(1 - 0.25) = ($450,000)(0.75) = $337,500.


3-15 a. (Dollar amounts in millions.) Industry
Firm Average

Current ratio = = = 2.73? 2?

= = = 30% 30%

= = = 11? 7?

= = = 13.67? 9?

= = = 5? 10?

DSO = = = 30 days 24 days

= = = 5.41? 6?

= = = 1.77? 3?

Profit margin = = = 3.40% 3%

= = = 6.00% 9%

= ROA ? EM = 6% ? 1.43 = 8.58% 12.9%

Alternatively,

ROE = = = 8.6%.

b. ROE = Profit margin ? Total assets turnover ? Equity multiplier

= ? ?

= ? ? = 3.4% ? 1.77 ? 1.43 = 8.6%.
Firm Industry Comment
Profit margin 3.4% 3.0% Good
Total assets turnover 1.77? 3.0? Poor
Equity multiplier 1.43 1.43* Good

*
1 – 0.30 = 0.7
EM =

Alternatively, EM = ROE/ROA = 12.9%/9% = 1.43.

c. Analysis of the Du Pont equation and the set of ratios shows that the turnover ratio of sales to assets is quite low. Either sales should be increased at the present level of assets, or the current level of assets should be decreased to be more in line with current sales.
Thus, the problem appears to be in the balance sheet accounts.

d. The comparison of inventory turnover ratios shows that other firms in the industry seem to be getting along with about half as much inventory per unit of sales as the firm. If the company’s inventory could be reduced, this would generate funds that could be used to retire debt, thus reducing interest charges and improving profits, and strengthening the debt position. There might also be some excess investment in fixed assets, perhaps indicative of excess capacity, as shown by a slightly lower-than-average fixed assets turnover ratio. However, this is not nearly as clear-cut as the overinvestment in inventory.

e. If the firm had a sharp seasonal sales pattern, or if it grew rapidly during the year, many ratios might be distorted. Ratios involving cash, receivables, inventories, and current liabilities, as well as those based on sales, profits, and common equity, could be biased. It is possible to correct for such problems by using average rather than end-of-period figures.

3-16 a. Here are the firm’s base case ratios and other data as compared to the industry:

Firm Industry Comment
Quick 0.8? 1.0? Weak
Current 2.3 2.7 Weak
Inventory turnover 4.8 7.0 Poor
Days sales outstanding 37 days 32 days Poor
Fixed assets turnover 10.0? 13.0? Poor
Total assets turnover 2.3 2.6 Poor
Return on assets 5.9% 9.1% Bad
Return on equity 13.1 18.2 Bad
Debt ratio 54.8 50.0 High
Profit margin on sales 2.5 3.5 Bad
EPS $4.71 n.a. --
Stock Price $23.57 n.a. --
P/E ratio 5.0? 6.0? Poor
P/CF ratio 2.0? 3.5? Poor
M/B ratio 0.65 n.a. --

The firm appears to be badly managed--all of its ratios are worse than the industry averages, and the result is low earnings, a low P/E, P/CF ratio, a low stock price, and a low M/B ratio. The company needs to do something to improve.

b. A decrease in the inventory level would improve the inventory turnover, total assets turnover, and ROA, all of which are too low. It would have some impact on the current ratio, but it is difficult to say precisely how that ratio would be affected. If the lower inventory level allowed the company to reduce its current liabilities, then the current ratio would improve. The lower cost of goods sold would improve all of the profitability ratios and, if dividends were not increased, would lower the debt ratio through increased retained earnings. All of this should lead to a higher market/book ratio and a higher stock price.
SOLUTION TO SPREADSHEET PROBLEMS




3-17 The detailed solution for the problem is available both on the instructor’s resource CD-ROM (in the file Solution for Ch 03-17 Build a Model.xls) and on the instructor’s side of the Harcourt College Publishers’ web site,
http://www.harcourtcollege.com/finance/theory.

3-18 a. The revised data and ratios are shown below:

INPUT DATA: KEY OUTPUT:

2002 Firm Industry
Cash $ 84,527 Quick 1.2 1.0
A/R 395,000 Current 3.0 2.7
Inventories 700,000 Inv. turn. 6.1 7.0
Land and bldg. 238,000 DSO 33 32
Machinery 132,000 F.A.turn. 8.3 13.0
Other F.A. 150,000 T.A.turn. 2.5 2.6
ROA 10.5% 9.1%
Accts. & notes pay. $ 275,000 ROE 19.9% 18.2%
Accruals 120,000 TD/TA 47.0% 50.0%
Long-term debt 404,290 PM 4.2% 3.5%
Common stock 575,000 EPS $7.78 n.a.
Retained earnings 325,237 Stock Price $46.68 n.a.
P/E ratio 6.0 6.0
Total assets $1,699,527 M/B 1.19 n.a.
Total claims $1,699,527

Income statement
Sales $4,290,000
Cost of G.S. 3,450,000
Adm. & sales exp. 248,775
Depreciation 159,000
Misc. 134,000
Net income $ 178,935
P/E ratio 6
No. of shares 23,000
Cash dividend $ 0.95

Under these new conditions, the company looks much better. Its turnover ratios are still low, but its ROA and ROE are above the industry average; its estimated P/E ratio is better, and its stock price is anticipated to double. There is still room for improvement, but the company is in much better shape.


b. The financial statements and ratios for the scenario in which the cost of goods sold decreases by an additional $125,000 are shown below. As you can see, the profit ratios are quite high and the stock price has risen to $66.24.

INPUT DATA: KEY OUTPUT:

2002 Firm Industry
Cash $ 159,527 Quick 1.4 1.0
A/R 395,000 Current 3.2 2.7
Inventories 700,000 Inv. turn. 6.1 7.0
Land and bldg. 238,000 DSO 33 32
Machinery 132,000 F.A.turn. 8.3 13.0
Other F.A. 150,000 T.A.turn. 2.4 2.6
ROA 14.3% 9.1%
Accts. & notes pay. $ 275,000 ROE 26.0% 18.2%
Accruals 120,000 TD/TA 45.0% 50.0%
Long-term debt 404,290 PM 5.9% 3.5%
Common stock 575,000 EPS $11.04 n.a.
Retained earnings 400,237 Stock Price $66.24 n.a.
P/E ratio 6.0 6.0
Total assets $1,774,527 M/B 1.56 n.a.
Total claims $1,774,527

Income statement
Sales $4,290,000
Cost of G.S. 3,325,000
Adm. & sales exp. 248,775
Depreciation 159,000
Misc. 134,000
Net income $ 253,935
P/E ratio 6
No. of shares 23,000
Cash dividend $ 0.95

c. The financial statements and ratios for the scenario in which the cost of goods sold increases by $125,000 over the revised estimate are shown below. As you can see, profits would decline sharply. The ROE would drop to 12.6%, EPS would fall to $4.52, the stock price would drop to $27.11, and the M/B ratio would be only 0.76.


INPUT DATA: KEY OUTPUT:

2002 Firm Industry
Cash $ 9,527 Quick 1.0 1.0
A/R 395,000 Current 2.8 2.7
Inventories 700,000 Inv. turn. 6.1 7.0
Land and bldg. 238,000 DSO 33 32
Machinery 132,000 F.A.turn. 8.3 13.0
Other F.A. 150,000 T.A.turn. 2.6 2.6
ROA 6.4% 9.1%
Accts. & notes pay. $ 275,000 ROE 12.6% 18.2%
Accruals 120,000 TD/TA 49.2% 50.0%
Long-term debt 404,290 PM 2.4% 3.5%
Common stock 575,000 EPS $4.52 n.a.
Retained earnings 250,237 Stock Price $27.11 n.a.
P/E ratio 6.0 6.0
Total assets $1,624,527 M/B 0.76 n.a.
Total claims $1,624,527

Income statement
Sales $4,290,000
Cost of G.S. 3,575,000
Adm. & sales exp. 248,775
Depreciation 159,000
Misc. 134,000
Net income $ 103,935
P/E ratio 6
No. of shares 23,000
Cash dividend $ 0.95

d. Computer models allow us to analyze quickly the impact of operating and financial decisions on the firm’s overall performance. A firm can analyze its financial ratios under different scenarios to see what might happen if a decision, such as the purchase of a new asset, did not produce the expected results. This gives the managers some idea about what might happen under the best and worst cases and helps them to make better decisions.

CYBERPROBLEM




3-19 The detailed solution for the cyberproblem is available on the instructor’s side of the Harcourt College Publishers’ web site, http://www.harcourtcollege.com/finance/theory.

MINI CASE



THE FIRST PART OF THE CASE, PRESENTED IN CHAPTER 2, DISCUSSED THE SITUATION THAT COMPUTRON INDUSTRIES WAS IN AFTER AN EXPANSION PROGRAM. THUS FAR, SALES HAVE NOT BEEN UP TO THE FORECASTED LEVEL, COSTS HAVE BEEN HIGHER THAN WERE PROJECTED, AND A LARGE LOSS OCCURRED IN 2001, RATHER THAN THE EXPECTED PROFIT. AS A RESULT, ITS MANAGERS, DIRECTORS, AND INVESTORS ARE CONCERNED ABOUT THE FIRM’S SURVIVAL.
DONNA JAMISON WAS BROUGHT IN AS ASSISTANT TO FRED CAMPO, COMPUTRON’S CHAIRMAN, WHO HAD THE TASK OF GETTING THE COMPANY BACK INTO A SOUND FINANCIAL POSITION. COMPUTRON’S 2000 AND 2001 BALANCE SHEETS AND INCOME STATEMENTS, TOGETHER WITH PROJECTIONS FOR 2002, ARE SHOWN IN THE FOLLOWING TABLES. ALSO, THE TABLES SHOW THE 2000 AND 2001 FINANCIAL RATIOS, ALONG WITH INDUSTRY AVERAGE DATA. THE 2002 PROJECTED FINANCIAL STATEMENT DATA REPRESENT JAMISON’S AND CAMPO’S BEST GUESS FOR 2002 RESULTS, ASSUMING THAT SOME NEW FINANCING IS ARRANGED TO GET THE COMPANY “OVER THE HUMP.”
JAMISON EXAMINED MONTHLY DATA FOR 2001 (NOT GIVEN IN THE CASE), AND SHE DETECTED AN IMPROVING PATTERN DURING THE YEAR. MONTHLY SALES WERE RISING, COSTS WERE FALLING, AND LARGE LOSSES IN THE EARLY MONTHS HAD TURNED TO A SMALL PROFIT BY DECEMBER. THUS, THE ANNUAL DATA LOOKED SOMEWHAT WORSE THAN FINAL MONTHLY DATA. ALSO, IT APPEARS TO BE TAKING LONGER FOR THE ADVERTISING PROGRAM TO GET THE MESSAGE ACROSS, FOR THE NEW SALES OFFICES TO GENERATE SALES, AND FOR THE NEW MANUFACTURING FACILITIES TO OPERATE EFFICIENTLY. IN OTHER WORDS, THE LAGS BETWEEN SPENDING MONEY AND DERIVING BENEFITS WERE LONGER THAN COMPUTRON’S MANAGERS HAD ANTICIPATED. FOR THESE REASONS, JAMISON AND CAMPO SEE HOPE FOR THE COMPANY--PROVIDED IT CAN SURVIVE IN THE SHORT RUN.
JAMISON MUST PREPARE AN ANALYSIS OF WHERE THE COMPANY IS NOW, WHAT IT MUST DO TO REGAIN ITS FINANCIAL HEALTH, AND WHAT ACTIONS SHOULD BE TAKEN. YOUR ASSIGNMENT IS TO HELP HER ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. PROVIDE CLEAR EXPLANATIONS, NOT YES OR NO ANSWERS.

BALANCE SHEETS

2002E 2001 2000___
ASSETS
CASH $ 14,000 $ 7,282 $ 9,000
SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS 71,632 0 48,600
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 878,000 632,160 351,200
INVENTORIES 1,716,480 1,287,360 715,200
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS $2,680,112 $1,926,802 $1,124,000
GROSS FIXED ASSETS 1,197,160 1,202,950 491,000
LESS ACCUMULATED DEPRECIATION 380,120 263,160 146,200
NET FIXED ASSETS $ 817,040 $ 939,790 $ 344,800
TOTAL ASSETS $3,497,152 $2,866,592 $1,468,800

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
ACCOUNTS PAYABLE $ 436,800 $ 524,160 $ 145,600
NOTES PAYABLE 600,000 720,000 200,000
ACCRUALS 408,000 489,600 136,000
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES $1,444,800 $1,733,760 $ 481,600
LONG-TERM DEBT 500,000 1,000,000 323,432
COMMON STOCK 1,680,936 460,000 460,000
RETAINED EARNINGS (128,584) (327,168) 203,768
TOTAL EQUITY $1,552,352 $ 132,832 $ 663,768
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY $3,497,152 $2,866,592 $1,468,800

NOTE: “E” INDICATES ESTIMATED. THE 2002 DATA ARE FORECASTS.


INCOME STATEMENTS

2002E 2001 2000___
SALES $7,035,600 $5,834,400 $3,432,000
COST OF GOODS SOLD 6,100,000 5,728,000 2,864,000
OTHER EXPENSES 312,960 680,000 340,000
DEPRECIATION 120,000 116,960 18,900
TOTAL OPERATING COSTS $6,532,960 $6,524,960 $3,222,900
EBIT $ 502,640 ($ 690,560) $ 209,100
INTEREST EXPENSE 80,000 176,000 62,500
EBT $ 422,640 ($ 866,560) $ 146,600
TAXES (40%) 169,056 (346,624) 58,640
NET INCOME $ 253,584 ($ 519,936) $ 87,960

EPS $1.014 ($5.199) $0.880
DPS $0.220 $0.110 $0.220
BOOK VALUE PER SHARE $6.209 $1.328 $6.638
STOCK PRICE $12.17 $2.25 $8.50
SHARES OUTSTANDING 250,000 100,000 100,000
TAX RATE 40.00% 40.00% 40.00%
LEASE PAYMENTS 40,000 40,000 40,000
SINKING FUND PAYMENTS 0 0 0

NOTE: “E” INDICATES ESTIMATED. THE 2002 DATA ARE FORECASTS.
RATIO ANALYSIS

INDUSTRY
2002E 2001 2000 AVERAGE
CURRENT 1.1? 2.3? 2.7?
QUICK 0.4? 0.8? 1.0?
INVENTORY TURNOVER 4.5? 4.8? 6.1?
DAYS SALES OUTSTANDING (DSO) 39.0 36.8 32.0
FIXED ASSETS TURNOVER 6.2? 10.0? 7.0?
TOTAL ASSETS TURNOVER 2.0? 2.3? 2.5?
DEBT RATIO 95.4% 54.8% 50.0%
TIE -3.9? 3.3? 6.2?
EBITDA COVERAGE -2.5? 2.6? 8.0?
PROFIT MARGIN -8.9% 2.6% 3.6%
BASIC EARNING POWER -24.1% 14.2% 17.8%
ROA -18.1% 6.0% 9.0%
ROE -391.4% 13.3% 18.0%
PRICE/EARNINGS -0.4? 9.7? 14.2?
PRICE/CASH FLOW -0.6? 8.0? 7.6?
MARKET/BOOK 1.7? 1.3? 2.9?
BOOK VALUE PER SHARE $1.33 $6.64 N.A.

NOTE: “E” INDICATES ESTIMATED. THE 2002 DATA ARE FORECASTS.


A. WHY ARE RATIOS USEFUL? WHAT ARE THE FIVE MAJOR CATEGORIES OF RATIOS?

ANSWER: RATIOS ARE USED BY MANAGERS TO HELP IMPROVE THE FIRM’S PERFORMANCE, BY LENDERS TO HELP EVALUATE THE FIRM’S LIKELIHOOD OF REPAYING DEBTS, AND BY STOCKHOLDERS TO HELP FORECAST FUTURE EARNINGS AND DIVIDENDS. THE FIVE MAJOR CATEGORIES OF RATIOS ARE: LIQUIDITY, ASSET MANAGEMENT, DEBT MANAGEMENT, PROFITABILITY, AND MARKET VALUE.


B. CALCULATE THE 2002 CURRENT AND QUICK RATIOS BASED ON THE PROJECTED BALANCE SHEET AND INCOME STATEMENT DATA. WHAT CAN YOU SAY ABOUT THE COMPANY’S LIQUIDITY POSITION IN 2000, 2001, AND AS PROJECTED FOR 2002? WE OFTEN THINK OF RATIOS AS BEING USEFUL (1) TO MANAGERS TO HELP RUN THE BUSINESS, (2) TO BANKERS FOR CREDIT ANALYSIS, AND (3) TO STOCKHOLDERS FOR STOCK VALUATION. WOULD THESE DIFFERENT TYPES OF ANALYSTS HAVE AN EQUAL INTEREST IN THE LIQUIDITY RATIOS?

ANSWER: CURRENT RATIO02 = CURRENT ASSETS/CURRENT LIABILITIES
= $2,680,112/$1,444,800 = 1.86?.

QUICK RATIO02 = (CURRENT ASSETS – INVENTORY)/CURRENT LIABILITIES
= ($2,680,112 - $1,716,480)/$1,444,800 = 0.667?.

THE COMPANY’S CURRENT AND QUICK RATIOS ARE LOW RELATIVE TO ITS 2000 CURRENT AND QUICK RATIOS; HOWEVER, THEY HAVE IMPROVED FROM THEIR 2001 LEVELS. BOTH RATIOS ARE WELL BELOW THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE, HOWEVER.


C. CALCULATE THE 2002 INVENTORY TURNOVER, DAYS SALES OUTSTANDING (DSO), FIXED ASSETS TURNOVER, AND TOTAL ASSETS TURNOVER. HOW DOES COMPUTRON’S UTILIZATION OF ASSETS STACK UP AGAINST OTHER FIRMS IN ITS INDUSTRY?

ANSWER: INVENTORY TURNOVER02 = SALES/INVENTORY
= $7,035,600/$1,716,480 = 4.10?.

DSO02 = RECEIVABLES/(SALES/360)
= $878,000/($7,035,600/360) = 44.9 DAYS.


FIXED ASSETS TURNOVER02 = SALES/NET FIXED ASSETS
= $7,035,600/$817,040 = 8.61?.

TOTAL ASSETS TURNOVER99 = SALES/TOTAL ASSETS
= $7,035,600/$3,497,152 = 2.01?.

THE FIRM’S INVENTORY TURNOVER RATIO HAS BEEN STEADILY DECLINING, WHILE ITS DAYS SALES OUTSTANDING HAS BEEN STEADILY INCREASING. WHILE THE FIRM’S FIXED ASSETS TURNOVER RATIO IS BELOW ITS 2000 LEVEL, IT IS ABOVE THE 2001 LEVEL. THE FIRM’S TOTAL ASSETS TURNOVER RATIO IS BELOW ITS 2000 LEVEL AND JUST SLIGHTLY BELOW ITS 2001 LEVEL.
THE FIRM’S INVENTORY TURNOVER AND TOTAL ASSETS TURNOVER ARE BELOW THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE. THE FIRM’S DAYS SALES OUTSTANDING IS ABOVE THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE (WHICH IS BAD); HOWEVER, THE FIRM’S FIXED ASSETS TURNOVER IS ABOVE THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE. (THIS MIGHT BE DUE TO THE FACT THAT COMPUTRON IS AN OLDER FIRM THAN MOST OTHER FIRMS IN THE INDUSTRY, IN WHICH CASE, ITS FIXED ASSETS ARE OLDER AND THUS HAVE BEEN DEPRECIATED MORE, OR THAT COMPUTRON’S COST OF FIXED ASSETS WERE LOWER THAN MOST FIRMS IN THE INDUSTRY.) THE FIRM’S OPERATING CAPITAL REQUIREMENT RATIO IS HIGHER THAN THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE, INDICATING THAT COMPUTRON REQUIRES MORE DOLLARS OF CAPITAL TO GENERATE A DOLLAR OF SALES THAN THE AVERAGE FIRM IN THE INDUSTRY.


D. CALCULATE THE 2002 DEBT, TIMES-INTEREST-EARNED, AND EBITDA COVERAGE RATIOS. HOW DOES COMPUTRON COMPARE WITH THE INDUSTRY WITH RESPECT TO FINANCIAL LEVERAGE? WHAT CAN YOU CONCLUDE FROM THESE RATIOS?

ANSWER: DEBT RATIO02 = TOTAL DEBT/TOTAL ASSETS
= ($1,444,800 + $500,000)/$3,497,152 = 55.61%.
TIE02 = EBIT/INTEREST = $502,640/$80,000 = 6.3?.

EBITDA COVERAGE01 = /
= ($502,640 + $120,000 + $40,000)/($80,000 + $40,000) = 5.5?.

THE FIRM’S DEBT RATIO IS MUCH IMPROVED FROM 2001, BUT IT IS STILL ABOVE ITS 2000 LEVEL AND THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE. THE FIRM’S TIE AND EBITDA COVERAGE RATIOS ARE MUCH IMPROVED FROM THEIR 2000 AND 2001 LEVELS, BUT THEY ARE STILL BELOW THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE.


E. CALCULATE THE 2002 PROFIT MARGIN, BASIC EARNING POWER (BEP), RETURN ON ASSETS (ROA), AND RETURN ON EQUITY (ROE). WHAT CAN YOU SAY ABOUT THESE RATIOS?

ANSWER: PROFIT MARGIN02 = NET INCOME/SALES = $253,584/$7,035,600 = 3.6%.

BASIC EARNING POWER02 = EBIT/TOTAL ASSETS = $502,640/$3,497,152 = 14.4%.

ROA02 = NET INCOME/TOTAL ASSETS = $253,584/$3,497,152 = 7.25%.

ROE02 = NET INCOME/COMMON EQUITY = $253,584/$1,552,352 = 16.34%.

THE FIRM’S PROFIT MARGIN IS ABOVE 2000 AND 2001 LEVELS AND IS AT THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE. THE BASIC EARNING POWER, ROA, AND ROE RATIOS ARE ABOVE BOTH 2000 AND 2001 LEVELS, BUT BELOW THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE DUE TO POOR ASSET UTILIZATION.


F. CALCULATE THE 2002 PRICE/EARNINGS RATIO, PRICE/CASH FLOW RATIOS, AND MARKET/BOOK RATIO. DO THESE RATIOS INDICATE THAT INVESTORS ARE EXPECTED TO HAVE A HIGH OR LOW OPINION OF THE COMPANY?

ANSWER: EPS = NET INCOME/SHARES OUTSTANDING = $253,584/250,000 = $1.0143.

PRICE/EARNINGS99 = PRICE PER SHARE/EARNINGS PER SHARE
= $12.17/$1.0143 = 12.0?.

CHECK: PRICE = EPS ? P/E = $1.0143(12) = $12.17.

CASH FLOW/SHARE02 = (NI + DEP)/SHARES = ($253,584 + $120,000)/250,000
= $1.49.
PRICE/CASH FLOW = $12.17/$1.49 = 8.2?.


BVPS = COMMON EQUITY/SHARES OUTSTANDING = $1,552,352/250,000 = $6.21.

MARKET/BOOK = MARKET PRICE PER SHARE/BOOK VALUE PER SHARE
= $12.17/$6.21 = 1.96X.

BOTH THE P/E RATIO AND BVPS ARE ABOVE THE 2000 AND 2001 LEVELS BUT BELOW THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE.


F. PERFORM A COMMON SIZE ANALYSIS AND PERCENT CHANGE ANALYSIS. WHAT DO THESE ANALYSES TELL YOU ABOUT COMPUTRON?

ANSWER: FOR THE COMMON SIZE BALANCE SHEETS, DIVIDE ALL ITEMS IN A YEAR BY THE TOTAL ASSETS FOR THAT YEAR. FOR THE COMMON SIZE INCOME STATEMENTS, DIVIDE ALL ITEMS IN A YEAR BY THE SALES IN THAT YEAR.

Common Size Balance Sheets



Assets





2000
2001
2002E
Ind.
Cash
0.6%
0.3%
0.4%
0.3%
ST Invest.
3.3%
0.0%
2.0%
0.3%
AR
23.9%
22.1%
25.1%
22.4%
Invent.
48.7%
44.9%
49.1%
41.2%
Total CA
76.5%
67.2%
76.6%
64.1%
Net FA
23.5%
32.8%
23.4%
35.9%
TA
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
Liabilities and Equity





2000
2001
2002E
Ind.
AP
9.9%
18.3%
12.5%
11.9%
Notes pay.
13.6%
25.1%
17.2%
2.4%
Accruals
9.3%
17.1%
11.7%
9.5%
Total CL
32.8%
60.5%
41.3%
23.7%
LT Debt
22.0%
34.9%
14.3%
26.3%
Com. Stock
31.3%
16.0%
48.1%
20.0%
Ret. Earnings
13.9%
-11.4%
-3.7%
30.0%
Total equity
45.2%
4.6%
44.4%
50.0%
Total L&E
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%





Common Size Income statement




2000
2001
2002E
Ind.
Sales
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
COGS
83.4%
98.2%
86.7%
84.5%
Other exp.
9.9%
11.7%
4.4%
4.4%
Depr.
0.6%
2.0%
1.7%
4.0%
EBIT
6.1%
-11.8%
7.1%
7.1%
Int. Exp.
1.8%
3.0%
1.1%
1.1%
EBT
4.3%
-14.9%
6.0%
5.9%
Taxes
1.7%
-5.9%
2.4%
2.4%
NI
2.6%
-8.9%
3.6%
3.6%

COMPUTRON HAS HIGHER PROPORTION OF CURRENT ASSETS (49.1%) THAN INDUSTRY (41.2%). COMPUTRON HAS SLIGHTLY LESS EQUITY (WHICH MEANS MORE DEBT) THAN INDUSTRY. COMPUTRON HAS MORE SHORT-TERM DEBT THAN INDUSTRY, BUT LESS LONG-TERM DEBT THAN INDUSTRY. COMPUTRON HAS HIGHER COGS (86.7) THAN INDUSTRY (84.5), BUT LOWER DEPRECIATION. RESULT IS THAT COMPUTRON HAS SIMILAR EBIT (7.1) AS INDUSTRY.


FOR THE PERCENT CHANGE ANALYSIS, DIVIDE ALL ITEMS IN A ROW BY THE VALUE IN THE FIRST YEAR OF THE ANALYSIS.

Percent Change Balance Sheets


Assets




2000
2001
2002E
Cash
0.0%
-19.1%
55.6%
ST Invest.
0.0%
-100.0%
47.4%
AR
0.0%
80.0%
150.0%
Invent.
0.0%
80.0%
140.0%
Total CA
0.0%
71.4%
138.4%
Net FA
0.0%
172.6%
137.0%
TA
0.0%
95.2%
138.1%
Liabilities and Equity




2000
2001
2002E
AP
0.0%
260.0%
200.0%
Notes pay.
0.0%
260.0%
200.0%
Accruals
0.0%
260.0%
200.0%
Total CL
0.0%
260.0%
200.0%
LT Debt
0.0%
209.2%
54.6%
Com. Stock
0.0%
0.0%
265.4%
Ret. Earnings
0.0%
-260.6%
-163.1%
Total equity
0.0%
-80.0%
133.9%
Total L&E
0.0%
95.2%
138.1%

Percent Change Income statement



2000
2001
2002E
Sales
0.0%
70.0%
105.0%
COGS
0.0%
100.0%
113.0%
Other exp.
0.0%
100.0%
-8.0%
Depr.
0.0%
518.8%
534.9%
EBIT
0.0%
-430.3%
140.4%
Int. Exp.
0.0%
181.6%
28.0%
EBT
0.0%
-691.1%
188.3%
Taxes
0.0%
-691.1%
188.3%
NI
0.0%
-691.1%
188.3%

WE SEE THAT 2002 SALES GROW 105% FROM 2000, AND THAT NI GROWS 188% FROM 2000. SO COMPUTRON HAS BECOME MORE PROFITABLE. WE SEE THAT TOTAL ASSETS GROW AT A RATE OF 138%, WHILE SALES GROW AT A RATE OF ONLY 105%. SO ASSET UTILIZATION REMAINS A PROBLEM.



H. USE THE EXTENDED DU PONT EQUATION TO PROVIDE A SUMMARY AND OVERVIEW OF COMPUTRON’S FINANCIAL CONDITION AS PROJECTED FOR 2002. WHAT ARE THE FIRM’S MAJOR STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES?

ANSWER: DU PONT EQUATION = ? ?
= 3.6% ? 2.01 ? 1/(1 - 0.5561) = 16.3%.

STRENGTHS: THE FIRM’S FIXED ASSETS TURNOVER WAS ABOVE THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE. HOWEVER, IF THE FIRM’S ASSETS WERE OLDER THAN OTHER FIRMS IN ITS INDUSTRY THIS COULD POSSIBLY ACCOUNT FOR THE HIGHER RATIO. (COMPUTRON’S FIXED ASSETS WOULD HAVE A LOWER HISTORICAL COST AND WOULD HAVE BEEN DEPRECIATED FOR LONGER PERIODS OF TIME.) THE FIRM’S PROFIT MARGIN IS SLIGHTLY ABOVE THE INDUSTRY AVERAGE, DESPITE ITS HIGHER DEBT RATIO. THIS WOULD INDICATE THAT THE FIRM HAS KEPT COSTS DOWN, BUT, AGAIN, THIS COULD BE RELATED TO LOWER DEPRECIATION COSTS.

WEAKNESSES: THE FIRM’S LIQUIDITY RATIOS ARE LOW; MOST OF ITS ASSET MANAGEMENT RATIOS ARE POOR (EXCEPT FIXED ASSETS TURNOVER); ITS DEBT MANAGEMENT RATIOS ARE POOR, MOST OF ITS PROFITABILITY RATIOS ARE LOW (EXCEPT PROFIT MARGIN); AND ITS MARKET VALUE RATIOS ARE LOW.


I. USE THE FOLLOWING SIMPLIFIED 2002 BALANCE SHEET TO SHOW, IN GENERAL TERMS, HOW AN IMPROVEMENT IN THE DSO WOULD TEND TO AFFECT THE STOCK PRICE. FOR EXAMPLE, IF THE COMPANY COULD IMPROVE ITS COLLECTION PROCEDURES AND THEREBY LOWER ITS DSO FROM 44.9 DAYS TO THE 32-DAY INDUSTRY AVERAGE WITHOUT AFFECTING SALES, HOW WOULD THAT CHANGE “RIPPLE THROUGH” THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (SHOWN IN THOUSANDS BELOW) AND INFLUENCE THE STOCK PRICE?

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE $ 878 DEBT $1,945
OTHER CURRENT ASSETS 1,802
NET FIXED ASSETS 817 EQUITY 1,552
LIABILITIES
TOTAL ASSETS $3,497 PLUS EQUITY $3,497


ANSWER: SALES PER DAY = $7,035,600/360 = $19,543.

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE UNDER NEW POLICY = $19,543 ? 32 DAYS
= $625,376.

FREED CASH = OLD A/R - NEW A/R = $878,000 - $625,376 = $252,624.


J. DOES IT APPEAR THAT INVENTORIES COULD BE REDUCED, AND, IF SO, HOW SHOULD THAT ADJUSTMENT AFFECT COMPUTRON’S PROFITABILITY AND STOCK PRICE.

ANSWER: THE INVENTORY TURNOVER RATIO IS LOW. IT APPEARS THAT THE FIRM EITHER HAS EXCESSIVE INVENTORY OR SOME OF THE INVENTORY IS OBSOLETE. IF INVENTORY WERE REDUCED, THIS WOULD IMPROVE THE LIQUIDITY RATIOS, THE INVENTORY AND TOTAL ASSETS TURNOVER, AND THE DEBT RATIO, WHICH SHOULD IMPROVE THE FIRM’S STOCK PRICE AND PROFITABILITY.


K. IN 2001, THE COMPANY PAID ITS SUPPLIERS MUCH LATER THAN THE DUE DATES, AND IT WAS NOT MAINTAINING FINANCIAL RATIOS AT LEVELS CALLED FOR IN ITS BANK LOAN AGREEMENTS. THEREFORE, SUPPLIERS COULD CUT THE COMPANY OFF, AND ITS BANK COULD REFUSE TO RENEW THE LOAN WHEN IT COMES DUE IN 90 DAYS. ON THE BASIS OF DATA PROVIDED, WOULD YOU, AS A CREDIT MANAGER, CONTINUE TO SELL TO COMPUTRON ON CREDIT? (YOU COULD DEMAND CASH ON DELIVERY, THAT IS, SELL ON TERMS OF COD, BUT THAT MIGHT CAUSE COMPUTRON TO STOP BUYING FROM YOUR COMPANY.) SIMILARLY, IF YOU WERE THE BANK LOAN OFFICER, WOULD YOU RECOMMEND RENEWING THE LOAN OR DEMAND ITS REPAYMENT? WOULD YOUR ACTIONS BE INFLUENCED IF, IN EARLY 2002, COMPUTRON SHOWED YOU ITS 2002 PROJECTIONS PLUS PROOF THAT IT WAS GOING TO RAISE OVER $1.2 MILLION OF NEW EQUITY CAPITAL?

ANSWER: WHILE THE FIRM’S RATIOS BASED ON THE PROJECTED DATA APPEAR TO BE IMPROVING, THE FIRM’S LIQUIDITY RATIOS ARE LOW. AS A CREDIT MANAGER, I WOULD NOT CONTINUE TO EXTEND CREDIT TO THE FIRM UNDER ITS CURRENT ARRANGEMENT, PARTICULARLY IF I DIDN’T HAVE ANY EXCESS CAPACITY. TERMS OF COD MIGHT BE A LITTLE HARSH AND MIGHT PUSH THE FIRM INTO BANKRUPTCY. LIKEWISE, IF THE BANK DEMANDED REPAYMENT THIS COULD ALSO FORCE THE FIRM INTO BANKRUPTCY.
CREDITORS’ ACTIONS WOULD DEFINITELY BE INFLUENCED BY AN INFUSION OF EQUITY CAPITAL IN THE FIRM. THIS WOULD LOWER THE FIRM’S DEBT RATIO AND CREDITORS’ RISK EXPOSURE.


L. IN HINDSIGHT, WHAT SHOULD COMPUTRON HAVE DONE BACK IN 2000?

ANSWER: BEFORE THE COMPANY TOOK ON ITS EXPANSION PLANS, IT SHOULD HAVE DONE AN EXTENSIVE RATIO ANALYSIS TO DETERMINE THE EFFECTS OF ITS PROPOSED EXPANSION ON THE FIRM’S OPERATIONS. HAD THE RATIO ANALYSIS BEEN CONDUCTED, THE COMPANY WOULD HAVE “GOTTEN ITS HOUSE IN ORDER” BEFORE UNDERGOING THE EXPANSION.


M. WHAT ARE SOME POTENTIAL PROBLEMS AND LIMITATIONS OF FINANCIAL RATIO ANALYSIS?

ANSWER: SOME POTENTIAL PROBLEMS ARE LISTED BELOW:

1. COMPARISON WITH INDUSTRY AVERAGES IS DIFFICULT IF THE FIRM OPERATES MANY DIFFERENT DIVISIONS.

2. DIFFERENT OPERATING AND ACCOUNTING PRACTICES DISTORT COMPARISONS.

3. SOMETIMES HARD TO TELL IF A RATIO IS “GOOD” OR “BAD.”

4. DIFFICULT TO TELL WHETHER COMPANY IS, ON BALANCE, IN A STRONG OR WEAK POSITION.

5. “AVERAGE” PERFORMANCE IS NOT NECESSARILY GOOD.

6. SEASONAL FACTORS CAN DISTORT RATIOS.

7. “WINDOW DRESSING” TECHNIQUES CAN MAKE STATEMENTS AND RATIOS LOOK BETTER.
N. WHAT ARE SOME QUALITATIVE FACTORS ANALYSTS SHOULD CONSIDER WHEN EVALUATING A COMPANY’S LIKELY FUTURE FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE?

ANSWER: TOP ANALYSTS RECOGNIZE THAT CERTAIN QUALITATIVE FACTORS MUST BE CONSIDERED WHEN EVALUATING A COMPANY. THESE FACTORS, AS SUMMARIZED BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF INDIVIDUAL INVESTORS (AAII), ARE AS FOLLOWS:

1. ARE THE COMPANY’S REVENUES TIED TO ONE KEY CUSTOMER?

2. TO WHAT EXTENT ARE THE COMPANY’S REVENUES TIED TO ONE KEY PRODUCT?

3. TO WHAT EXTENT DOES THE COMPANY RELY ON A SINGLE SUPPLIER?

4. WHAT PERCENTAGE OF THE COMPANY’S BUSINESS IS GENERATED OVERSEAS?

5. COMPETITION

6. FUTURE PROSPECTS

7. LEGAL AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT