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133(Suppl):965S“73S.
Hays, J. H., A. DiSabatino, R. T. Gorman, et al. “Effect of a High Saturated Fat and No-
Starch Diet on Serum Lipid Subfractions in Patients with Documented Atheroscle-
rotic Cardiovascular Disease.” Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 2003; 78;1331“36.
Hu, F. B., L. Bronner, W. C. Willett, et al. “Fish and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake and Risk
of Coronary Heart Disease in Women. Journal of the American Medical Association,
2002; 287:1815“21.
Nestel, P., H. Shige, S. Pomeroy, et al. “The n-3 Fatty Acids Eicosapentaenoic Acid and
Docosahexaenoic Acid Increase System Arterial Compliance in Humans.” Ameri-
can Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2002; 76:326“30.
Uribarri, J., M. Peppa,W. Cai, et al.“Restriction of Dietary Glycotoxins Reduces Exces-
sive Advanced Glycation End Products in Renal Failure Patients.” Journal of the
American Society of Nephrology, 2003; 14:728“31.

CHAPTER 9. STRESS, GENES, AND NUTRITION
Benton, D., J. Haller, and J. Fordy. “Vitamin Supplementation for 1 Year Improves
Mood.” Neuropsychobiology, 1995; 32:98“105.
Benton, D., R. Grif¬ths, and J. Haller.“Thiamine Supplementation Mood and Cognitive
Functioning.” Psychopharmacology, 1997; 129:66“71.
Bjelland, I., G. S. Tell, S. E. Vollset, et al. “Folate, Vitamin B12, Homocysteine, and the
MTHFR 677C“T Polymorphism in Anxiety and Depression.” Archives of General
Psychiatry, 2003; 60:618“26.
Black, P. H., and L. D. Garbutt. “Stress, In¬‚ammation and Cardiovascular Disease.”
Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 2002; 52:1“23.
Bower, B. “Worried to Death: Lifelong Inhibitions Hasten Rodents™ Deaths.” Science
News, 2003; 164:373.
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Brody, S. “High-Dose Ascorbic Acid Increases Intercourse Frequency and Improves
Mood: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.” Biological Psychiatry, 2002;
52:371“74.
Caspi, A., K. Sugden, T. E. Mof¬tt, et al. “In¬‚uence of Life Stress on Depression: Mod-
eration by a Polymorphism in the 5-HTT Gene.” Science, 2003; 301:386“89.
Elmadfa, I., D. Jajchrzak, P. Rust, et al. “The Thiamine Status of Adult Humans
Depends on Carbohydrate Intake.” International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition
Research, 2001; 71:217“21.
Kakuda,T.,A. Nozawa,T. Unno, et al.“Inhibiting Effects of Theanine on Caffeine Stim-
ulation Evaluated by EEG in the Rat.” Biosci Biotechnol Biochem, 2000; 64:287“93.
Kiecolt“Glaser, J. K., K. J. Preacher, R. C. MacCallum, et al. “Chronic Stress and Age-
Related Increases in the Proinflammatory Cytokines IL-6.” Proceedings of the
National Academy of Sciences, 2003: epub ahead of print.
Leventhal, A. G., Y. Wang, M. Pu, et al. “GABA and Its Antagonists Improved Visual
Cortical Function in Senescent Monkeys.” Science, 2003; 300:812“15.
Palatnik,A., K. Prolov, M. Fux, et al.“Double-Blind, Controlled Crossover Trial of Inos-
itol versus Fluvoxamine for the Treatment of Panic Disorder.” Journal of Clinical
Psychopharmacology, 2001; 21:335“39.
Rossi E. The Psychobiology of Gene Expression: Neuroscience and Neurogenesis in
Hypnosis and the Healing Arts. New York: W. W. Norton Professional Books, 2002.
Salzano, J. “Taming Stress.” Scienti¬c American, September 2003: 87“95.
Santarelli, L., M. Saxe, C. Gross, et al. “Requirement of Hippocampal Neurogenesis for
the Behavioral Effects of Antidepressants.” Science, 2003; 301:805“9.
Yokogoshi, H., Y. Kato, Y. M. Sagesaka, et al. “Reduction Effect of Theanine on Blood
Pressure and Brain 5-Hydroxyindoles in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.” Biosci
Biotechnol Biochem, 1995; 59:615“18.
Williams, R. B., J. C. Carefoot, and N. Schneiderman. “Psychological Risk Factors for
Cardiovascular Disease. More Than One Culprit at Work.” Journal of the American
Medical Association, 2003; 290:2190“92.

CHAPTER 10. NUTRITIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SPECIFIC DISEASES, A TO Z
Temple, L. K., R. S. McLeod, S. Gallinger, et al. “De¬ning Disease in the Genomics
Era.” Science, 2001; 293:807“8.

AGING
Ames, B. N. “Micronutrients Prevent Cancer and Delay Aging.” Toxicology Letters,
1998; 102“103:5“18.
Harman, D. “Free Radical Theory of Aging.” Mutation Research, 1992; 275:257“66.
”””. “Aging: Phenomena and Theories.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sci-
ences, 1998; 854:1“7.
Purba, M., A. Kouris-Blazos, N. Wattanapenpaiboon, et al. “Skin Wrinkling: Can Food
Make a Difference?” Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 2001; 20:71“80.

ALZHEIMER™S DISEASE
Clark, R., A. D. Smith, K. A. Jobst, et al. “Folate, Vitamin B12, and Serum Total Homo-
cysteine Levels in Con¬rmed Alzheimer™s Disease.” Archives of Neurology, 1998;
55:1449“55.
Engelhart, M. J., M. I. Geerlings, A. Ruitenberg, et al. “Dietary Intake of Antioxidants
and Risk of Alzheimer™s Disease.” Journal of the American Medical Association,
2002; 287:3223“29.
234 SELECTED REFERENCES


Hager, K., A. Marahrens, M. Kenklies, et al. “Alpha-Lipoic Acid as a New Treatment
Option for Alzheimer Type Dementia.” Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2001;
32:275“82.
LeBars, P. L., M. M. Katz, N. Berman, et al. “A Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind Ran-
domized Trial of an Extract of Ginkgo Biloba for Dementia.” Journal of the Ameri-
can Medical Association, 1997; 278:1327“32.
Liu, J., E. Head, A. M. Gharib, et al. “Memory Loss in Old Rats Is Associated with Brain
Mitochondrial Decay and RNA/DNA Oxidation: Partial Reversal by Feeding Acetyl-
L-Carnitine and/or R-A-Lipoic Acid.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sci-
ences, 2002; 99:2356“61.
Morris, M. C., D. A. Evans, J. L. Bienias, et al. “Dietary Intake of Antioxidant Nutrients
and the Risk of Incident Alzheimer™s Disease in a Biracial Community Study.” Jour-
nal of the American Medical Association, 2002; 287:3230“37.
Sano, M., C. Ernesto, R. G. Thomas, et al. “A Controlled Trial of Selegiline, Alpha-Toco-
pherol, or Both as Treatment for Alzheimer™s Disease.” New England Journal of Med-
icine, 1997; 336:1216“22.
Selhub, J., L. C. Bagley, J. Miller, et al. “B Vitamins, Homocysteine, and Neurocognitive
Function in the Elderly.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2000; 71(suppl):
614S“20S.
Seshadri, S., A. Beiser, J. Selhub, et al. “Plasma Homocysteine as a Risk Factor for
Dementia and Alzheimer™s Disease.” New England Journal of Medicine, 2002;
346:476“83.
Zandi, P. P., H. J. C. Anthony, A. S. Khachaturian, et al. “Reduced Risk of Alzheimer Dis-
ease in Users of Antioxidant Vitamin Supplements. The Cache County Study.”
Archives of Neurology, 2004; 61:82“88.
BIRTH DEFECTS
Bennett, M. “Vitamin B12 De¬ciency, Infertility and Recurrent Fetal Loss.” Journal of
Reproductive Medicine, 2001; 46:209“12.
Busciglio, J., and B. A. Yankner. “Apoptosis and Increased Generation of Reactive Oxy-
gen Species in Down™s Syndrome Neurons In Vitro.” Nature, 1995; 378: 776“79.
Loffredo, L. C. M., J. M. P. Souza, J. A. S. Freitas, et al. “Oral Clefts and Vitamin Supple-
mentation.” Cleft Palate”Cranialfacial Journal, 2001; 38:76“83.
MacLeod, K. Down Syndrome and Vitamin Therapy. Canada: Kemanso Publishing, 2003.
Preston-Martin, S., J. M. Pogoda, B. A. Mueller, et al. “Prenatal Vitamin Supplementation
and Risk of Childhood Brain Tumors.” International Journal of Cancer, 1998; 11:17“22.
Turkel, H., and I. Nusbaum. Medical Treatment of Down Syndrome and Genetic Diseases.
South¬eld, MI: Ubiotica, 1985.
van Rooij, I. A. L. M., C. Vermeij-Keers, L. A. J. Kluijtmans, et al. “Does the Interaction
between Maternal Folate Intake and the Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase
Polymnorphisms Affect the Risk of Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate?” American
Journal of Epidemiology, 2003; 157:583“91.
Shaw, G. M., T. Quach, V. Nelson, et al. “Neural Tube Defects Associated with Maternal
Periconceptional Dietary Intake of Simple Sugars and Glycemic Index.” American
Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2003; 78:972“78.

CANCER
Boileau, T. W. M., Z. Liao, S. Kim, et al. “Prostate Carcinogenesis in N-methyl-N-
nitrosourea (NMU)”Testosterone-Treated Rats Fed Tomato Powder, Lycopene, or
Energy-Restricted Diets.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2003; 95:1578“86.
Clark, L. C., G. F. Combs Jr, B. W. Turnbull, et al. “Effects of Selenium Supplementation
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for Cancer Prevention in Patients with Carcinoma of the Skin. A Randomized Con-
trolled Trial.” Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Study Group. Journal of the Ameri-
can Medical Association, 1996; 276:1957“63.
Drisko, J. A., J. Chapman, V. J. Hunter. “The Use of Antioxidants with First-Line
Chemotherapy in Two Cases of Ovarian Cancer.” Journal of the American College
of Nutrition, 2003; 22:118“23.
Giovannucci, E., A. Ascherio, E. B. Rimm, et al. “Intake of Carotenoids and Retinol in
Relation to Risk of Prostate Cancer.” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 1995;
87:1767“76.
Hartman, T. J., D. Albanes, P. Pietinen, et al. “The Association between Baseline Vita-
min E, Selenium, and Prostate Cancer in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene
Cancer Prevention Study.” Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, 1998;
7:335“40.
Kim, Y. I. “Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Polymorphisms, Folate, and Cancer
Risk: A Paradigm of Gene-Nutrient Interactions in Carcinogenesis.” Nutrition
Reviews, 2000; 58:205“17.
”””, I. P. Pogribny, A. G. Basnakian, et al. “Folate De¬ciency in Rats Induces DNA
Strand Breaks and Hypomethylation within the p53 Tumor Suppressor Genes.”
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1997; 65:46“52.
Kucuk, O., F. H. Sarker, Z. Djuric, et al. “Effects of Lycopene Supplementation in
Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer.” Experimental Biology and Medicine,
2002; 227:881“85.
Lockwood, K., S. Moesgaard, and K. Folkers. “Partial and Complete Regression of
Breast Cancer in Patients in Relation to Dosage of Coenzyme Q10.” Biochemical
and Biophysical Research Communications, 1994; 199:1504“8.
Patterson, R. E., E. White, A. R. Kristal, et al. “Vitamin Supplements and Cancer Risk:
The Epidemiological Evidence.” Cancer Causes and Control, 1997; 8:786“802.
Prasad, K. N., B. Kumar, X. D. Yan, et al. “a-Tocopherol Succinate, the Most Effective
Form of Vitamin E for Adjuvant Cancer Treatment:A Review.” Journal of the Amer-
ican College of Nutrition, 2003; 22:108“17.

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES
Boaz, M., S. Smetana, T. Weinstein, et al. “Secondary Prevention with Antioxidants of
Cardiovascular Disease in Endstage Renal Disease (SPACE): Randomised
Placebo-Controlled Trial.” Lancet, 2000; 356:1213“18.
Boushey, C. J., et al. “A Quantitative Assessment of Plasma Homocysteine as a Risk
Factor for Vascular Disease.” Journal of the American Medical Association, 1995;
274:1049“57.
Buffon, A., L. M. Biasucci, G. Liuzzo, et al. “Widespread Coronary In¬‚ammation in
Unstable Angina.” New England Journal of Medicine, 2002; 347:5“12.
Duffy, S. J., N. Gokce, M. Holbrook, et al. “Treatment of Hypertension with Ascorbic
Acid.” Lancet, 1999; 354:2048“49.
Hays, J. H., A. DiSabatino, R. T. Gorman, et al. “Effect of a High Saturated Fat and No-
Starch Diet on Serum Lipid Subfractions in Patients with Documented Atheroscle-
rotic Cardiovascular Disease.” Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 2003; 78;1331“36.
Hu, F. B., L. Bronner, W. C. Willett, et al. “Fish and Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intake and Risk
of Coronary Heart Disease in Women.” Journal of the American Medical Associa-
tion, 2002; 287:1815“21.
Jialal, I., M. Traber, and S. Deveraj. “Is There a Vitamin E Paradox?” Current Opinion
in Lipidology, 2001; 12:49“53.
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Kurl, S., T. P. Tuomainen, J. A. Laukkanen, et al. “Plasma Vitamin C Modi¬es the Asso-
ciation between Hypertension and Risk of Stroke.” Stroke, 2002; 33:1568“73.
Lobo, A., A. Naso, and K. Aheart. “Reduction of Homocysteine Levels in Coronary
Artery Disease by Low-Dose Folic Acid Combined with Vitamin B6 and B12.” Amer-
ican Journal of Cardiology, 1999; 83:821“25.
Loria, C. M., D. D. Ingram, J. J. Feldman, et al. “Serum Folate and Cardiovascular Dis-
ease Mortality among U.S. Men and Women.” Archives of Internal Medicine, 2000;
160;3258“62.
McCully, K. S. “Homocysteinemia and Arteriosclerosis.” American Heart Journal, 1972;
83:571“73.
”””. “Homocystine, Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis: Implications for Oral Contra-
ceptive Users.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1975; 28:542“49.
”””.“Vascular Pathology of Homocysteinemia: Implications for the Pathogenesis of
Arteriosclerosis.” American Journal of Pathology, 1969; 56:111“28.
Morris, M. C., D. A. Evans, J. L. Bienias, et al. “Dietary Intake of Antioxidant Nutrients
and the Risk of Incident Alzheimer™s Disease in a Biracial Community Study.” Jour-
nal of the American Medical Association, 2002; 287:3230“37.
”””. “Vitamin E and Cognitive Decline in Older Persons.” Archives of Neurology,
2002; 59:1125“32.
Nestel, P., H. Shige, S. Pomeroy, et al. “The n-3 Fatty Acids Eicosapentaenoic Acid and
Docosahexaenoic Acid Increase System Arterial Compliance in Humans.” Ameri-
can Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2002; 76:326“30.
Plotnick, G. D., M. C. Corretti, and R. A. Vogel. “Effect of Antioxidant Vitamins on the
Transient Impairment of Endothelium-Dependent Brachial Artery Vasoactivity fol-
lowing a Single High-Fat Meal.” Journal of the American Medical Association, 1997;
278:1682“86.
Ridker, P. M., C. H. Hennekens, J. E. Buring, et al. “C-Reactive Protein and Other
Markers of In¬‚ammation in the Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease in Women.”
New England Journal of Medicine, 2000; 342:836“43.
Salonen, J. T., K. Nyyssonen, R. Salonen, et al. “Antioxidant Supplementation in Ath-
erosclerosis Prevention (ASAP) Study: A Randomized Trial of the Effect of Vita-
mins E and C on 3-Year Progression of Carotid Atherosclerosis.” Journal of Internal
Medicine, 2000; 248:377“86.
Stephens, N. G., A. Parsons, P. M. Scho¬eld, et al. “Randomized Controlled Trial of Vit-
amin E in Patients with Coronary Disease: Cambridge Heart Antioxidant Study
(CHAOS).” Lancet, 1996; 347:781“86.
Wald, D. S., M. Law, and J. K. Morris. “Homocysteine and Cardiovascular Disease: Evi-
dence on Causality from a Meta-Analysis.” British Medical Journal, 2002;
325:1202“8.
Warsi, A. A., B. Davies, and G. Morris-Stiff. “Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm and Its Cor-
relation to Plasma Homocysteine and Vitamins.” European Journal of Vascular and
Endovascular Surgery, 2004; 27:75“79.

CARDIOMYOPATHY AND HEART FAILURE
Bliznakov, E. G., and D. J. Wilkins. “Biochemical and Clinical Consequences of Inhibit-
ing Coenzyme Q10 Biosynthesis by Lipid-Lowering HMG-CoA Reductase
Inhibitors (Statins): A Critical Overview.” Advances in Therapy, 1998; 15:218“28.
Folkers, K., P. Langsjoen, and P. H. Langsjoen. “Therapy with Coenzyme Q10 of
Patients in Heart Failure Who Are Eligible or Ineligible for a Transplant.” Bio-
chemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 1992; 182:247“53.
Fosslien, E. “Mitochondrial Medicine”Cardiomyopathy Caused by Defective Oxida-
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tive Phosphorylation.” Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science, 2003; 33: 371“95.
Langsjoen, P. H., A. Langsjoen, R. Willis, et al. “Treatment of Hypertrophic Cardiomy-
opathy with Coenzyme Q10.” Molecular Aspects of Medicine, 1997;18 (Suppl):
S145“51.
Leslie, D., and M. Gheorghiade. “Is There a Role for Thiamine Supplementation in the
Management of Heart Failure.” American Heart Journal, 19996; 131:1248“50.
Rizos, I. “Three-Year Survival of Patients with Heart Failure Caused by Dilated Car-
diomyopathy and L-Carnitine Administration.” American Heart Journal, 2000;
139:S120“23.
Sarter, B. “Coenzyme Q10 and Cardiovascular Disease: A Review.” Journal of Cardio-
vascular Nursing, 2002; 16: 9“20.

CELIAC DISEASE
Banco, G. “Conditions and Disorders Associated with Celiac Disease.” Journal of Pedi-
atric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, 2000; 31(Suppl 3):S28, Abstract #100.
Braly, J., and R. Hoggan. Dangerous Grains. New York: Penguin Putnam, 2002.
Cicarelli, G., G. Della Rocca, M. Amboni, et al. “Clinical and Neurological Abnormali-
ties in Adult Celiac Disease.” Neurological Sciences, 2003; 24:311“17.
Cordain, L., J. B. Miller, S. B. Eaton, et al. “Plant-Animal Subsistence Ratios and
Macronutrient Energy Estimates in Worldwide Hunter-Gatherer Diets.” American
Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2000; 71:682“92.
Eaton, S. B., and S. B. Eaton II. “Paleolithic vs. Modern Diets”Selected Pathophysical
Implications.” European Journal of Nutrition, 2000; 39:67“70.
Fasano, A. “Celiac Disease”How to Handle a Clinical Chameleon.” New England
Journal of Medicine, 2003; 348:2568“70.
Hadjivassiliou, M., R. A. Grunewald, and G. A. Davies-Jones. “Gluten Sensitivity: A
Many-Headed Hydra.” British Medical Journal, 1999; 318:1710“11.
McManus, R., and D. Kelleher. “Celiac Disease”the Villain Unmasked?” New
England Journal of Medicine, 2003; 348:2573“74.
Smith, M. D. Going Against the Grain. Chicago: Contemporary Books, 2002.

DEPRESSION AND MOODINESS
Benton, D., R. Grif¬ths, and J. Haller. “Thiamine Supplementation, Mood and Cogni-
tive Functioning.” Psychopharmacology, 1997; 129:66“71.
”””, J. Haller, and J. Fordy. “Vitamin Supplementation for 1 Year Improves Mood.”
Neuropsychobiology, 1995; 32:98“105.
Brenner, R., V. Azbel, S. Madhusoodanan, et al. “Comparison of an Extract of Hyper-
icum (LI 160) and Sertraline in the Treatment of Depression: A Double-Blind, Ran-
domized Pilot Study.” Clinical Therapeutics, 2000; 22:411“19.
Caspi, A., K. Sugden, T. E. Mof¬tt, et al. “In¬‚uence of Life Stress on Depression: Mod-
eration by a Polymorphism in the 5-HTT Gene.” Science, 2003; 301:386“89.
Schrader, E. “Equivalence of St. John™s Wort Extract (Ze 117) and Fluoxetine: A
Randomized Controlled Study in Mild-Moderate Depression.” International Clini-
cal Psychopharmacology, 2000; 15:61“68.

FATIGUE AND CHRONIC FATIGUE
Barbiroli, B., R. Medori, H. J. Tritschler, et al. “Lipoic (Thioctic) Acid Increases Brain
Energy Availability and Skeletal Muscle Performance as Shown by In Vivo 31P-MRS
in a Patient with Mitochondrial Cytopathy.” Journal of Neurology, 1995; 242:472“77.
Heap, L. C., T. J. Peters, S. Wessely. “Vitamin B Status in Patients with Chronic Fatigue
Syndrome.” Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, 1999; 92:183“85.
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Plioplys, A. V., and S. Plioplys. “Amantadine and L-Carnitine Treatment of Chronic
Fatigue Syndrome. Neuropsychobiology, 1997; 35:16“23.
Sinatra, S. T. “Coenzyme Q10: A Vital Therapeutic Nutrient for the Heart with Special
Application in Congestive Heart Failure.” Connecticut Medicine, 1997; 61:707“11.

HEMOCHROMATOSIS
Heath, A. L. M., and S. J. Fairweather. “Health Implications of Iron Overload: The Role
of Diet and Genotype.” Nutrition Reviews, 2003; 61:45“62.
Kaltwasser, J. P., E. Werner, K. Schalk, et al. “Clinical Trial on the Effect of Regular Tea
Drinking on Iron Accumulation in Genetic Haemochromatosis.” Gut, 1998; 43:
699“704.

INFLAMMATORY DISEASES
Devaraj, S., and I. Jialal. “Alpha Tocopherol Supplementation Decreases Serum C-
Reactive Protein and Monocyte Interleukin-6 Levels in Normal Volunteers and
Type 2 Diabetic Patients.” Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 2000; 29:790“92.
Edmonds, S. E., P. G. Yinyard, R. Guo, et al. “Putative Analgesic Activity of Repeated
Oral Doses of Vitamin E in the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis. Results of a
Prospective Placebo Controlled Double Blind Trial.” Annals of the Rheumatic Dis-
eases, 1997; 56:649“55.
Curtis, C. L., C. E. Hughes, C. R. Flannery, et al. “N-3 Fatty Acids Speci¬cally Modulate
Catabolic Factors Involved in Articular Cartilage Degradation.” Journal of Biolog-
ical Chemistry, 2000; 275:721“24.
Helmy, M., M. Shohayeb, M. H. Helmy, et al. “Antioxidants as Adjuvant Therapy in
Rheumatoid Disease”a Preliminary Study.” Arzneimittel-Forschung/Drug
Research, 2001; 51:293“98.
Jenkinson, A. M., A. R. Collins, S. J. Duthie, et al. “The Effect of Increased Intakes of
Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Vitamin E on DNA Damage in Human Lympho-
cytes.” FASEB Journal, 1999; 13:2138“42.
Kornman, K. S., P. M. Martha, and G. W. Duff. “Genetic Variations and In¬‚ammation: A
Practical Nutrigenomics Opportunity.” Nutrition, 2004; 20:44“49.
Lau, C. S., K. D. Morley, and J. J. F. Belch. “Effects of Fish Oil Supplementation on Non-
Steroidal Anti-In¬‚ammatory Drug Requirement in Patients with Mild Rheumatoid
Arthritis”A Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Study.” British Journal of Rheuma-
tology, 1993; 32:982“89.
Linos, A., V. G. Kaklamani, E. Kaklamani, et al. “Dietary Factors in Relation to
Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Role for Olive Oil and Cooked Vegetables.” American
Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1999; 70:1077“82.
Liu, S., J. E. Manson, J. Buring, et al. “A High-Glycemic Diet in Relation to Plasma Lev-
els of High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Middle-Aged Women.” American
Journal of Epidemiology, 2001; 153 (Suppl 11):S97.
Upritchard, J. E., W. H. F. Sutherland, and J. I. Mann. “Effect of Supplementation with
Tomato Juice, Vitamin E, and Vitamin C on LDL Oxidation and Products of
In¬‚ammatory Activity in Type 2 Diabetes.” Diabetes Care, 2000; 23:733“38.
Zurier, R. B., R. G. Rossetti, E. W. Jacobson, et al. “Gamma-Linolenic Acid Treatment
of Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study.” Arthritis and
Rheumatism, 1996; 11:1808“17.

OSTEOPOROSIS
Dimai, H. P., S. Porta, G. Wirmsberger, et al. “Daily Oral Magnesium Supplementation
Suppresses Bone Turnover in Young Adult Males.” Journal of Clinical Endocrinol-
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ogy and Metabolism, 1998; 83:2742“48.
Guillemant, J., H.-T. Le, C. Accarie, et al. “Mineral Water as a Source of Dietary Cal-
cium: Acute Effects on Parathyroid Function and Bone Resorption in Young Men.”
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2000; 71:999“1002.
Hegarty, V. M., H. M. May, and K.-T. Khaw. “Tea Drinking and Bone Mineral Density
in Older Women.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2000; 71:1003“7.
Kim, G. S., C. H. Kim, J. Y. Park, et al. “Effects of Vitamin B12 on Cell Proliferation and
Cellular Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Osteo-
progenitor Cells and UMR106 Osteoblastic Cells.” Metabolism, 1996; 45:1443“46.
Mühlbauer, R. C., and F. Li. “Effect of Vegetables on Bone Metabolism.” Nature, 1999;
401:343“44.
New, S. A., S. P. Robins, M. K. Campbell, et al. “Dietary In¬‚uences on Bone Mass and
Bone Metabolism: Further Evidence of a Positive Link between Fruit and Vegetable
Consumption and Bone Health. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2000;
71:142“51.
Sokoll, L. J., S. L. Booth, M. E. O™Brien, et al. “Changes in Serum Osteocalcin, Plasma
Phylloquinone, and Urinary Gamma-Carboxyglutamic Acid in Response to Altered
Intakes of Dietary Phylloquinone in Human Subjects.” American Journal of Clini-
cal Nutrition, 1997; 65:779“84.

THE VITAMIN D QUANDARY
Bretherton-Watt, D., R. Given-Wilson, J. L. Mansi, et al. “Vitamin D Receptor Gene
Polymorphisms Are Associated with Breast Cancer Risk in a UK Caucasian Popu-
lation.” British Journal of Cancer, 2001; 85:171“75.
Hayes, C. E. “Vitamn D: National Inhibitor of Multiple Sclerosis.” Proceedings of the
Nutrition Society, 2000; 59:531“35.
Hou, M. F., Y. C. Tien, G. T. Lin, et al. “Association of Vitamin D Receptor Gene Poly-
morphism with Sporadic Breast Cancer in Taiwanese Patients.” Breast Cancer
Research and Treatment, 2002; 74:1“7.
Ogata, E. “The Potential Use of Vitamin D Analogs in the Treatment of Cancer.” Cali-
ci¬ed Tissue International, 1997; 60:130“33.
Ortlepp, J. R., J. Lauscher, R. Hoffman, et al. “The Vitamin D Receptor Gene Variant
Is Associated with the Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Coronary Artery
Disease.” Diabetic Medicine, 2001; 18:842“45.
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PARKINSON™S DISEASE
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INDEX




Alzheimer™s disease, 37, 69, 74,
acetyl-L-carnitine, 50, 51“53, 161
159“162, 189, 196, 204
acrylamide, 113
the gene connection, 159“160
Addison™s disease, 194
statistics, 159
adenine nucleotides, 53
symptoms of, 159
adenosine diphosphate (ADP), 54, 186
what happens, 159
adenosine triphosphate (ATP), 41“42,
what you can do, 160“162
43, 49, 53, 54, 59
Alzheimer™s Foundation, 159
adrenaline, 76, 145, 147
American Medical Association, 201
adult-onset (type 2) diabetes, obesity
Ames, Bruce N., 44, 50, 59, 157
and, 195“199
amino acids, 12, 24, 65“67, 99“100
advanced glycation end products
supplements, 66“67
(AGEs), 24, 66, 100“101
AMP-activated protein kinase
aging, 6, 42, 154“158, 155“156
(AMPK), 198
bioenergetics and, 44
amputation, circulatory problems
daily supplements, 157“158
leading to, 196
DNA damage and, 16, 154
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou
the gene connection, 155“156
Gehrig™s disease), 55
lifestyle and, 29
Anderson, Richard A., 198“199
what happens, 154“155
anthocyanidins, 85
what you can do, 156“157
anticoagulants, 73, 193
AIDS, 79
antidepressants, 143, 146, 185
alcohol consumption, 29, 81, 145, 173
antioxidants, 49“89, 177. See also free
allergies, 189
radicals; individual antioxidants
ALOX5 gene, 175, 177, 190
cancer treatment combining
alpha-lipoic acid, 22, 48“51, 68, 88“89,
chemotherapy and, 171, 173
166, 186, 198
cardiovascular disease and, 175,
for Alzheimer™s disease, 161
176“177
supplement guidelines, 50“51,
dietary, 72
88“89

243
244 INDEX


the gene connection, 163“164
antioxidants (continued)
what happens, 162“163
functions of, 6, 68“72
what you can do, 164“166
in¬‚ammatory diseases and, 69, 74,
Bjelland, Dr. Ingvar, 142
191
blindness, 195
Parkinson™s disease and, 201
bloodletting, 188
skin care and, 206“208
blood pressure, 45, 77
synergy, 72
bone density, 36, 156, 191“194. See also
UV-ray exposure, wrinkles, and,
osteoporosis
206“208
brain, the
anxiety, 141, 147, 152
antidepressants and, 146
APOE E4 gene, cardiovascular disease
antioxidants and, 69
and, 154, 174, 176
stress and, 147, 148“149
apoptosis, 70“71, 167
structure, behaviors that modify
appetite, 145
genes and, 144“146
apple cider vinegar, 199
brain cancer, childhood, 163, 166
arachidonic acid, 175
BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, breast
arginine, 66“67
cancer and, 154, 169, 170
arrowroot as sauce thickener, 124
breads, whole-wheat, 112
arthritis, 147
breakfast recipes, 132“134
Artichoke Hearts and Dijon Sauce,
breast cancer, 71, 82, 85, 169“170, 172,
Shrimp with, 125
194, 197
asparagine, 113
BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, 154,
Asparagus, Simple Baked, 129
169, 170
asthma, 10, 189
CHEK2 gene, 169
Atkins diet, 97“98
Brody, Dr. Stuart, 151
Avocado and Chicken Omelette, 133
brown rice, 106“107, 120
Seafood and, 124“125
bananas, 103
burgers
and Nut Butter, Fresh, 135
Chicken, with Romano Cheese and
Barrett™s esophagus, 79“80
Olives/or Shiitake Mushrooms,
B-complex vitamins, 22, 37, 150, 160,
130
167“168, 174, 184, 186. See also
Turkey, Simple, 130“131
speci¬c vitamins
butter, 105
DNA methylation and, 61“65
DNA repair and, 6, 57“65
caffeine, 150
supplement guidelines, 56, 67
calcium, 192“193, 194
Beal, Dr. M. Flint, 55
calorie restriction, 32“33
Beck, Melinda, 79, 178
cancer, 32, 48, 114, 167“173, 189, 196,
Bellanti, Dr. Joseph, 55“56, 186
204. See also speci¬c types of
Benjamin, Dr. Jonathan, 151
cancer
beta-amyloid protein, 74, 159, 160
antioxidants and, 69“70, 84, 85, 86,
beta-carotene, 68, 71, 81“82, 173, 201,
173
207, 208
coenzyme Q10 and, 46, 172
beverages, 107“108, 120, 150, 207
damaged DNA and, 12, 16
bioenergetics, 41“43
DNA methylation and, 61“62
bio¬‚avonoids. See ¬‚avonoids
DNA-repair ef¬ciency and, 26
birth defects, 14“15, 60“61, 142,
folic acid and, 167, 171“172
162“166. See also speci¬c birth
the gene connection, 168“170
defects
245
INDEX


Cathcart, Dr. Robert, III, 77
heated carbohydrates and, 113
celiac disease, 16, 75“76, 112, 180“183,
lycopene and, 172
188, 194
oncogenes, 61, 168, 171“172
the gene connection, 181“182
p21 gene, 81
what happens, 180“181
p53 cancer-suppressing genes, 16, 61,
what you can do, 182“183
80, 168
cells, 12
re¬ned carbohydrates and, 6
apoptosis, 70“71, 167
selenium and, 14, 79, 171
Center for Science in the Public
supplement guidelines, 80
Interest, 107
vitamin C and, 77“78, 173
Centers for Disease Control, 164,
vitamin E and, 171, 173
196“197
what happens, 167“168
cerebral ataxia, 201
what you can do, 170“173
cervical cancer, 82, 169, 173
canola oil, 104, 105
chain restaurants. See fast foods
carbohydrates, 138
chamomile in skin creams, 208
moderate consumption high-carb
chanterelle mushrooms
foods, 106“107
and Chicken in Cream Sauce, 127
nonstarchy fruits and vegetables, 31,
and Romano Cheese, Saut©ed, 128
101, 102“103, 193, 197, 206, 207
cheese
sugars and re¬ned, 6, 30, 31, 32, 66,
Chicken Burgers with Romano, and
97, 107, 108“109, 112“113,
Olives/or Shiitake Mushrooms,
149“150, 176, 177, 182, 184, 186,
130
195, 196, 197, 201, 207, 210
Mushrooms and Romano, Saut©ed,
cardiomyopathy, 21“22, 43“45, 177“180
128
the gene connection, 178
Wrap, Deli Turkey and, 131
what happens, 177“178
chicken
what you can do, 178“180
Burgers with Romano Cheese and
cardiovascular disease, 10, 32, 106, 147,
Olives/or Shiitake Mushrooms,
173“177, 182, 189, 195, 197
130
ALOX5 gene, 175, 177
and Chanterelle Mushrooms in
antioxidants and, 73, 175, 176“177
Cream Sauce, 127
APOE E4 gene, 154, 174, 176
Chipotle Fajitas, 121
the gene connection, 174“175
and Egg Salad, 131
homocysteine levels and, 15, 17,
with Mustard Sauce, 123
63“64, 142, 174, 176, 204
Omelette, Avocado and, 133
ribose and, 54
Roasted, with Rosemary and Garlic,
what happens, 173
127
what you can do, 176“177
Chipotle Fajitas, 121
carnitine, 7, 22, 51“53, 166, 179, 186,
cholesterol, 16, 63, 104, 174, 195
187
familial hypercholesterolemia, 175
supplement guidelines, 53
low-density lipoprotein (LDL), 73,
carotenoids, 22, 68, 80“84, 106, 172,
115, 153, 174“175, 176
173, 206, 207
statin drugs and coenzyme Q10,
supplement guidelines, 83
47“48, 178
carpal tunnel syndrome, 37
chromium, 23, 198
carrots
chromosomes, 12
Rosemary, 129
chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS),
and Shallots, Roasted, 128
51“52, 55“56, 185“187
Cashew and Veggie Omelette, 132
246 INDEX


genetic environment and, 5, 31
cinnamon, 198“199
Deli Turkey and Cheese Wrap, 131
citrus ¬‚avonoids, 85“86
depression, 17, 24, 141, 147, 173,
citrus fruits, 103
183“185, 186, 198, 203
Clark, Larry C., 79
antidepressants, 143, 146, 185
cleft lip and palate, 59, 162, 163,
the gene connection, 183“184
164“165
genes and risk of, 142“144
coconut milk
what happens, 183
Rice Pudding, Exotic, 134
what you can do, 184“85
Sauce, Salmon with, 122
de Rijk, Dr. Maarten C., 201
coconut oil, 105
desserts, 108“109
coenzyme Q10, 7, 166, 173, 179
Banana and Nut Butter, Fresh, 135
as antioxidant, 44, 172, 173, 177
Greek Yogurt with Honey, 134
breast cancer and, 172
Rice Pudding, Exotic, 134
energy production and, 22, 43“48,
diabetes, 15, 35, 49, 83“84, 88, 109, 147,
179, 186, 187
182, 186, 189, 194
Parkinson™s disease and, 37, 46“47,
obesity and type 2, 195“199
200
dietary guidelines, 93“116. See also eat-
statin drugs and, 47“48, 178
ing habits
supplement guidelines, 48
fresh, whole foods, 98
coffee, 108, 150
herbs and spices for seasoning food,
cold, common, 77
106
collagen, 77, 205, 206
nonstarchy fruits, 102“103
colon cancer, 81, 85, 169, 194
nonstarchy vegetables, 101
congestive heart failure. See heart
nutrient-dense diet, 96“97
failure
oils and fats, 103“105
cooking and cooking methods, 6, 66,
organically produced foods, 109“112
99, 101“102, 117“121
partially hydrogenated vegetable
food palette, 118“121
oils and trans fats, 115“116
protein quality and, 100“101
quality protein, 99“101
recipes, 121“135
re¬ned carbohydrates and sugars,
Cooney, Craig A., 61
112“113
copper, 186, 202“203
re¬ned cooking oils, 113“115
coronary artery disease. See cardiovas-
summary of, 96
cular disease
water and teas, 107“108
cortisol, 32, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 156
dinner recipes, 121“127
coxsackie virus, 79, 178
disease, de¬ning, 153“154
C-reactive protein, 32, 74, 148, 175, 189,
diuretics, 179
191
DNA
creatine, 54“55
antioxidants to protect. See antioxi-
cyanide, 186
dants
cysteine, 87
ATP and structure of, 42
cytokines, 148, 189
functions of, 5, 11“12
nucleotide bases, 12
Dawson-Hughes, Dr. Bess, 192
vitamins and production of, 14
De Flora, Dr. Silvio, 87
DNA damage
degenerative diseases. See also individ-
causes of, 18“22
ual diseases
cell replication, mutations during,
DNA damage and, 16“17, 28
23, 57
gene therapy and, 9“10
247
INDEX


degenerative diseases and, 16“17 creatine and, 54“55
free radicals and. See free radicals, free radicals and, 19“20, 42“43, 155
DNA damage and nutrients that enhance, 43“56
transcription, errors during, 23“24 ribose and, 53“54
DNA methylation, 61“65, 168, 173, 174 Engelhart, Dr. Marianne J., 160
diseases associated with poor, 64“65, environmental enrichment, 148
142, 183 Epstein-Barr virus, 185
elevated homocysteine levels and, erectile dysfunction, 67, 85
63“64, 142 estrogen, 110, 173
DNA repair, 19, 202 exercise. See physical activity
B-complex vitamins and, 6, 57“65, Ezra, Dr. David, 179“180
171“172
DNA-repair enzymes, 25“26 Fajitas, Chipotle, 121
limitations of, 26 fast foods, 29, 30, 32, 111“112, 115,
nutrition and, 6, 57“67 137“138, 182, 197, 210
docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 191 fat, abdominal, 32, 148, 156, 197
dopamine, 200“201 fatigue, 20, 21, 41, 42, 51“52, 76, 151,
Down syndrome, 162“163, 164, 185“187. See also energy level
165“166 the gene connection, 185“186
Drisko, Dr. Jeanne, 173 what happens, 185
droopy eyelids, 20“21
what you can do, 186“187
Duke University Medical Center,
fats, dietary, 31, 103“105, 120. See also
35“36
oils
Dwyer, James H., 175
polyunsaturated, 175
saturated, 97“98, 100, 104, 176, 207
eating habits, 8“9, 27“28, 66, 197, 210
trans fats, 104, 115“116
ancient, 29“31, 98, 103, 104
favism, 17
dietary guidelines. See dietary guide-
fearful behavior, 144, 145
lines
Feed Your Genes Right Quiz, 7“9
fat consumption, 103, 104
Fenech, Michael, 58“59
steps in changing, 93“95
Fennel, Olives, and Raisins, Saut©ed,
stress and nutrition, 149“152
128“129
Eaton, Dr. S. Boyd, 30
¬ber, 31, 101, 150, 197
Eberlein-Konig, Dr. Bernadette, 207
¬ght-or-¬‚ight response, 147
Ebola virus, 79
Fillet of Sole with Almonds and
edema, 106
Parsley, 126
eggs
¬sh, 207
omelettes. See omelettes
cold-water, 80, 100, 104, 175, 176,
Salad, Chicken and, 131
177
and Veggie Stir-Fry, Breakfast,
Fillet of Sole with Almonds and
133“134
Parsley, 126
eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 191
Trout Amandine, Simple, 122
“empty calories,” 30, 32, 112
Tuna Salad, 131
energy level, 7, 42. See also fatigue
¬sh oils, 104, 191
alpha-lipoic acid and, 48“51
5-lipoxygenase enzyme, 190
energy production
¬‚avonoids, 22, 68, 84“88, 108, 191, 206
carnitine and acetyl-L-carnitine and,
51“53 in organic produce, 109, 110
coenzyme Q10 and, 22, 43“48, 179, supplement guidelines, 86
186, 187 ¬‚axseed, 80
248 INDEX


ginkgo biloba, 69, 71“72, 86, 161“162
folic acid, 15“16, 64, 142“143, 157, 160,
Giovannucci, Dr. Edward, 172
168, 174, 176, 183, 184, 201
glucose and blood glucose levels, 32,
Alzheimer™s disease and, 161
155, 184, 186, 195, 196, 197, 198.
birth defects and, 14“15, 60“61, 163,
See also diabetes; insulin
164, 165
glucose tolerance, 108“109, 195
cancer and, 167, 171“172
glutathione-S-transferases, 168
dietary sources of, 101, 174
gluten and celiac disease, 16, 75“76,
DNA synthesis and, 58, 60, 183
112, 180“182
homocysteine and, 64“65
grapeseed extract, 85
sickle-cell anemia and, 204“205
grapeseed oil, 105
Food and Drug Administration, 113
Greek Yogurt with Honey, 134
Food Network, 102, 117
green tea, 151, 194, 205
food palette, 118“121
guidelines, dietary. See dietary guide-
free radicals, 68“69, 114, 155, 160, 168,
lines
174, 175, 189. See also antioxidants
antioxidant reduction of damage
Hagen, Tory, 50
from, 71“72
Hager, Dr. Klaus, 161
DNA damage and, 18“20, 28, 33, 57,
Harman, Dr. Denham, 19
68“69, 71“72, 167, 173
Harris, R. Adron, 145
Down syndrome and, 166
Harvard Medical School, 201
energy production and, 19“20,
Harvard School of Public Health, 82
42“43, 155
healing, 147
stress genes and, 69“70
DNA synthesis and, 60
ultraviolet rays and, 206
health status, current, 8
free-range animals, organically raised,
heart attack, 173, 174, 176
100, 110
heart disease. See cardiovascular
fresh, whole foods, 98
disease
fruits, 119“120
heart failure, 21“22, 43“44, 45, 53, 54,
nonstarchy, 102“103, 206
177“180, 194
starchy, 103
the gene connection, 178
what happens, 177“178
gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA),
what you can do, 178“180
150, 151“152
Hellenbrand, Dr. Wiebke, 201
gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), 177, 191
Hemil¤, Harri, 77
“gap junction communication,” 80
hemochromatosis, 17“18, 187“188
garlic extract, 204, 205
hemophilia, 17
gene expression, 13, 56, 61
Hen, Rene, 146
nutrition and, 13“14
herbal teas, 108, 120
genes
herbs and spices, seasoning food with,
behavior and, 141“146
106, 120
composition of, 5
hereditary ataxia, 46
as ¬‚exible, not ¬xed, 5, 209“210
heredity. See also DNA; genes
functions of, 5, 12
nutritional de¬ciencies, effect on off-
nutritional de¬ciencies and, 34
spring of, 34“36
stress and. See stress
predisposition to diseae and, 6, 7
gene therapy, 9“10, 209
Herzenberg, Lenora and Leonard, 87
genetic individuality, nutritional needs
hesperidin, 68
and, 37
Hippocrates, 4
genetic testing, 211“216
249
INDEX


Lee, Dr. Richard T., 76“77
Hoffer, Dr. Abram, 35, 62“63, 202
LeMond, Greg, 21
homocysteine, 15, 16, 17, 61, 63“64, 142,
leukemia, 10, 24“25, 85
160, 164, 165, 174, 176, 183, 204
Levander, Orville, 178
“hostile personality,” 145“146
Levine, Dr. Mark, 52, 77“78
human immunode¬ciency virus, 48
levodopa, 46“47, 199“200
hunter-gatherer diets, 30“32
life expectancy, 28, 33
hypertension, 77, 106, 147, 195
antioxidants and, 69
hypoglycemia, 186
limonene, 85
Linnane, Anthony, 44
in¬‚ammation and in¬‚ammatory dis-
linoleic acid, 114, 175
eases, 31, 32, 48, 154, 155“156, 160,
linolenic acid, 104
177, 189“191, 194
Lockwood, Dr. Knud, 46, 172
antioxidants and, 69, 74, 191
longevity, 154, 177
the gene connection, 189“190
low-density lipoprotein (LDL), 73,
omega-6 fatty acids and, 104, 114
115, 159, 174“175, 176
stress hormones and, 147“148
Ludwig, Dr. David S., 196
what happens, 189
lunch recipes, 130“131
what you can do, 190“191
lung cancer, 79, 81
In¬‚ammation Syndrome, The
lutein, 37, 68, 82“83, 207
(Challem), 115, 148, 177, 190
lycopene, 68, 82, 172, 207
in¬‚uenza, 77, 79
macademia nut oil, 105
inositol, 151
MacLeod, Kent, 166
insulin, 49, 145, 155, 173, 184, 186,
macular degeneration, 37, 83, 114
195“196, 197, 198. See also
magnesium, 37, 193, 194
diabetes
March of Dimes, 164, 165
ideal levels of, 32
Mattson, Mark P., 201
sugars and re¬ned carbohydrates
McLeod, Dr. Malcolm N., 198
and production of, 6, 32, 112“113,
meal planning, 99, 118
149“150, 195
sample two-week plan, 135“137
interleukin-6, 148, 189, 191
Meaney, Michael J., 144“145
iron, 205
memory, 10, 147, 161
hemochromatosis and, 17“18, 187“188
ginkgo biloba and, 69
iron-de¬ciency anemia, 75
migraine headaches, 37
minerals. See speci¬c minerals
Johnston, Carol S., 52, 199
mineral water, 193“194
mitochondria
Karmano Cancer Institute, Detroit, 82
acquired DNA damage to, 21“22, 44,
Kennedy, Tay S., 204
155
Khaw, Dr. Kay-Tee, 78
energy production, and free radicals,
kidney disease, 106, 195
19“20, 42“43, 155
kiwifruit, 102
mitochondrial myopathies, 20“22, 44,
Krebs cycle, 42, 43, 48“49, 51, 55
55, 186
kryptopyrrole, 63, 184, 201, 202, 203
Mof¬tt, Terrie E., 143
Kucuk, Dr. Omer, 172
moodiness, 17, 183“185
Morris, Martha Clare, 160
labels, reading, 110“111
MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate
lactose intolerance, 182
reductase) enzyme, 15, 16“17, 60,
Langsjoen, Dr. Peter, 45, 179, 187
64, 142, 163, 164, 174, 183, 184
LeBars, Dr. Pierre L., 162
250 INDEX


olives
multiple sclerosis, 15, 37, 194
Chicken Burgers with Romano
muscular dystrophy, 45“46, 55
Cheese and, 130
mushrooms
Saut©ed Fennel with Raisins and,
Chanterelles and Chicken in Cream
128“129
Sauce, 127
omega-3 fats, 104“105, 114, 175
Chicken Burgers with Romano
ratio of omega-6 fats and, 31, 104,
Cheese and Olives/or Shiitake, 130
190
Saut©ed, and Romano Cheese, 128
sources of, 100, 104, 175, 177, 190,
Spinach and Shiitake Mushrooms,
191
Saut©ed, 127“128
omega-6 fats, 114, 115, 190
N-acetylcysteine (NAC), 23, 67, 68, ratio of omega-3 fats and, 31, 104, 190
86“88 omelettes
NADH, 55“56, 186 Avocado and Chicken, 133
naringin and naringenin, 85 Cashew and Veggie, 132
National Academy of Sciences, Mini-, Simple, Fast, 132
192“193 Omran, Dr. Heyder, 54
National Osteoporosis Foundation, “one-carbon metabolism,” 58
191 organically produced foods, 100,
nerve damage, 195“196 109“112
niacinamide. See vitamin B3 (niacin, osteoarthritis, 189
niacinamide) osteoporosis, 15, 36, 75, 182
night blindness, 37 the gene connection, 192
nitric oxide, 85 what happens, 191“194
novelty, 148 what you can do, 192“194
“nuclear factor kappa beta,” 49 oxidative phosphorylation, 42
nuclear factor kappa-beta, 189
Nut Butter, Fresh Banana and, 135 Packer, Lester, 72, 206
nutrient-dense foods, 6, 29, 30, 96“97, p21 gene, cancer and, 81
176, 182“183, 197, 201, 210 pancreatic cancer, 82
nutrient loading, 156“157 panic attacks, 151
nutrient testing, 213“216 Parkinson™s disease, 46“47, 199“201
nutrigenomics, 4 coenzyme Q10 and, 37, 46“47, 200
nuts, 109 the gene connection, 199“200
what happens, 199
obesity, 32, 35, 62, 147, 177, 182, 186, what you can do, 200“201
189 partially hydrogenated vegetable oils,
epidemic of, 196“197 115
type 2 diabetes and, 195“199 Pauling, Linus, 77, 204
obsessive-compulsive disorder, 151 p53 cancer-suppressing genes, 16, 61,
Ohnishi, S. Tsuyoshi, 204 80, 168
oils, 103“105, 120. See also fats, dietary pears, 103
partially hydrogenated vegetable periodontal disease, 37, 194
oils, 115 pesticides, 109, 110, 155, 185, 201
re¬ned, 104, 105, 113“115, 175, 177, phenylketonuria, 17
190 Philadelphia Biomedical Research
oleic acid, 104, 177 Institute, 205
olive oil, 104“105, 114, 115, 138, 177, physical activity, 7, 8, 32, 148, 149, 177,
207 197
251
INDEX


gene activity and, 56 resources, 217“223
weight-bearing exercises, 194 restaurants, 137“138
phytonutrients, 101 asking about ingredients at, 111“112
Pima Indians, 196 fast-food and chain. See fast foods
plant sterols, 175 retinitis pigmentosa, 46, 83
Plioplys, Dr. Audius V., 51, 187 rheumatoid arthritis, 74, 189, 191
pollution, 155, 173 ribo¬‚avin. See vitamin B2 (ribo¬‚avin)
polyphenols, 86 ribose, 53“54
portion size, 197 rice
posttraumatic stress disorder, 147 Pudding, Exotic, 134
potassium, 106 Seafood and, 124“125
potatoes, 112“113 varieties of nonwhite, 106“107, 120
Prasad, Kedar N., 171 white, 113, 120, 138
prediabetes, 49, 83“84, 109, 155, 186, Rice Pudding, Exotic, 134
197 Rimland, Bernard, 166
Preston-Martin, Dr. Susan, 166 Rizos, Dr. Ioannis, 179
processed and re¬ned foods, 29, 31, 32, RNA, 23“24, 66
112, 113, 177, 179, 190, 207. See functions of, 12
also carbohydrates, sugars and repair enzymes, 26
re¬ned Romano cheese
trans-fatty acids in, 115“116 Chicken Burgers with Olives/or
prostaglandin E2, 148, 189 Shiitake Mushrooms and, 130
prostate cancer, 79, 82, 169, 170, 172, Saut©ed Mushrooms and, 128
194 Rossi, Ernest, 141
protein, 31, 65, 119, 150, 184, 197 Rudolph, Dr. Rebecca, 79“80
high-protein diets, 97“98
quality, 99“101 Sadowski, James, 193
Prozac, 143, 146, 185 salad
psoriasis, 85, 194 Chicken and Egg, 131
Psychobiology of Gene Expression, Tuna, 131
The (Rossi), 148 salad dressing, 105
Pycnogenol, 85, 191, 208 salmon, 190
pyroluria, 17, 201“203 with Coconut Milk Sauce, 122
pyroxidine. See vitamin B6 salt, 106
Sano, Mary, 160“161
sashimi, 66, 100, 138
quercetin, 68, 191
saturated fats, 97“98, 100, 104, 176, 207
Quiz, Feed Your Genes Right, 7“9
sauces, 103
arrowroot as thickener, 124
radiation, 19, 59, 71, 85, 157
Scallops with Saffron Sauce, 123“124
Raisins, Saut©ed Fennel with Olives
schizophrenia, 17, 62“63, 201, 202
and, 128“129
Schoenthaler, Stephen J., 150
recipes
Schultz, Peter G., 69
breakfast, 132“134
scurvy, 37, 52
desserts, 134“135
seafood
dinner main courses, 121“127
and Rice, 124“125
lunch, 130“131
Scallops with Saffron Sauce, 123“124
side dishes, 127“130
shrimp. See shrimp
re¬ned foods. See processed and
seasonings, 106, 120
re¬ned foods
252 INDEX


free radicals and stress genes, 69“70,
selenium, 6, 14, 23, 68, 79“80, 168, 171,
155“156
178
nutrients that reduce, 149“152
serotonin, 17, 24, 143, 146, 149, 150,
vitamin C and, 76
183“184, 185, 202
stroke, 37, 173, 174, 176, 177
Shallots, Roasted Carrots and, 128
sugars. See carbohydrates, sugars and
Shiitake Mushrooms
re¬ned
Chicken Burgers with Romano
sunburn, 206, 207, 208
Cheese and Olives/or, 130
sunlight, exposure to
and Romano Cheese, Saut©ed, 128
aging skin and wrinkles and,
Saut©ed Spinach and, 127“128
205“207
shopping for food, 99
vitamin D and, 195
shrimp
sunscreen, 195, 208
with Artichoke hearts and Dijon
sweet potatoes, 106, 113
sauce, 125
Mashed, 129“130
Marinated with Garlic and Shallots,
Syndrome X, 49, 182
125“126
Szent-Györgyi, Dr. Albert, 37
Seafood and Rice, 124“125
Shults, Dr. Clifford W., 47, 201
Tanopolsky, Dr. Mark, 54“55
Shute, Dr. Evan, 73
taurine, 183, 202
sickle-cell anemia, 17, 33“34, 66,
teas, 108, 120
203“205
green tea, 151, 194, 205
side dish recipes, 127“130
Terrapin Ridge, 103, 105
silymarin, 71, 198
testosterone, 173
Sinatra, Dr. Stephen, 45
theanine, 151
skin, 85
thiamine. See vitamin B1 (thiamine)
vitamin C and, 78
wrinkles and aging, 16, 18, 205“208 trans-fatty acids, 104, 115“116
smoking, 19, 29, 71, 81, 160, 167, 173, triglycerides, 195
177 Trout Almandine, Simple, 122
snacks, 108“109, 197 tryptophan and 5-HTP, 152, 185
sodium, 106 tumor necrosis factor, 189
soft drinks, 107, 150, 207 Tuna Salad, 131
spices and herbs, seasoning foods with, Turkel, Dr. Henry, 165“166
106, 120 turkey
spina bi¬da, 14“15, 59, 162, 163“164, Burgers, Simple, 130“131
165 and Cheese Wrap, Deli, 131
Spinach and Shiitake Mushrooms, Scaloppine Piccata, Baked, 126
Saut©ed, 127“128
St. John™s wort, 146, 185 University of Bath, 207
Stahl, Wilhelm, 207 University of Chile, 166
statin drugs, 47“48, 178 U.S. Public Health Service, 165
Steegers-Theunissen, Regine P. M.,
163, 164 vegetables, 119, 176
stir-frying, 66, 101 leafy green, 80, 101, 174
Breakfast Egg and Veggie Stir-Fry, nonstarchy, 101, 193, 197, 206, 207
133“134 Omelette, Cashew and Veggie, 132
Stivala, Lucia A., 81 starchy, 101, 120, 138
stress, 7, 8, 146“152, 177, 186, 201, 202, Stir-Fry, Breakfast Egg and Veggie,
203 133“134
253
INDEX


vitamin E, 22, 49, 68, 71, 72“75, 166,
vegetarians, 66
191, 205, 207
visual acuity, 82“83
Alzheimer™s disease and, 37, 160“161
vitamin A, 22, 37, 201
cancer and, 171, 173
vitamin B1 (thiamine), 150, 179“180,
cardiovascular disease and, 175,
184, 186
176“177
vitamin B2 (ribo¬‚avin), 37, 186
Parkinson™s disease and, 201
vitamin B3 (niacin, niacinamide), 55,
selecting natural, 176“177
62, 63, 186
supplement guidelines, 74“75
DNA synthesis and, 58, 59“60
vitamin K, 17, 193
vitamin B6 (pyroxidine), 17, 37, 64,
171“172, 176, 183, 184
Wahlqvist, Dr. Mark L., 207
DNA synthesis and, 58, 59, 60
Wang, Hui-Xin, 161
pyroluria and, 17, 201“202, 203
warfarin (Coumadin), 73
vitamin B12, 37, 64, 161, 171“172, 176
water, 107“108, 120
bone formation and, 193
mineral, 193“194
DNA synthesis and, 58“59, 60
Watson, Ronald, 207
vitamin B-complex. See B-complex
weight, body, 145
vitamins; individual vitamins
white blood cells, 189
vitamin C, 22, 37, 49, 55, 62, 68, 76“78,
whole foods, fresh, 98
109, 151, 175, 176, 177, 187, 201,
wild game, 100
204, 208
Wild Rice, 130
bone density and, 193
Williams, Roger J., 37
cancer and, 77“78, 173
Wright, Dr. James G., 154
-carnitine-energy connection, 52
wrinkles, 16, 18, 205“208
supplement guidelines, 78
vitamin D, 22, 37, 157
yams, 106, 113
exposure to sunlight and, 195, 208
Yankner, Dr. Bruce A., 166

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